United States
This project's goal is to educate the current group members of Humans for Animals on ethical and sustainable beekeeping practices. We visited the campus beekeeper Ed Popelka who gave us a tour of his farm and educated us on his practices and how he differs from the global commercial beekeeping businesses. Through this we will learn how bees benefit us and how we can all help the bees!
United States
I am going to buy trees at the store, using my money. Then I will put up posters and we will hold a Tree day, where everyone will get to plant a tree. It will be held yearly.
United States
To complete my project I'm going to get earth worms, release them into the school garden and the solid around the garden.This will help decompose dead organisms and help improve the quality of the soil. Over time they will reproduce and continue to help improve the ecosystem.
United States
My project will take carbon dioxide and turn it into oxygen due to me planting several shrubs and flowers. I will take a section of my backyard and create a flowerbed by digging up the existing grass, dig holes, and then plant the shrubs and flowers there. I will then cover the area with soil and water it every other day.
United States
First step will be to replenish the soil. We have already tested it for major nutrients: phosphorous, nitrogen, and potassium and found it to be seriously lacking in all three. In addition, as we took soil samples we did not find any insects or worms in the ground, it was that poor. After building the soil with organic materials, we will plant drought tolerant shrubs appropriate to our climate and the availability of water on our campus. These plants will eventually spread their roots systems and help keep the soil in place. Following the planting we will mulch the entire area to further combat the airborne dust that is such an environmental irritant to our students . Lastly we will create student maintenance teams to ensure the ongoing flourishing of the garden .
United States
We will collect certain items to send back to Terracycle (for which we receive points). Kellogg's receipts will gain us points for tree-planting, as well. We will discuss further where our pennies will make the most positive impact.
United States
Our group sold lemonade at a stand at the local library to earn $60 to go toward an apple tree. The tree nursery donated the remaining $40 when they sold us the $100 tree for the amount we earned. Students then dug the hole and planted the 6 foot tall tree. We eagerly await spring to be sure our tree made it through the Colorado winter.
United States
Actions we are taking: 1. We are currently rallying students to be ready to fill the capitol building when this resolution is voted on. We are contacting schools ranging from elementary to college around the state. We are still waiting to receive a time slot on the floor schedule, and will keep students posted with updates so they can be ready to carpool to the capitol from their location in Utah on the day this happens. 2. We are circulating an online petition in support of our climate resolution. So far, it has nearly 250 signatures. 3. We are identifying the legislative committees that our resolution will have to be passed through, and contacting representatives on those committees to urge them to support our resolution. 4. We plan to contact every possible state news network to cover this initiative once our Resolution is introduced. 5. If our efforts are successful and this resolution is passed, we will continue to work with our state legislators to ensure that they stay devoted to their commitment to address climate change.
United States
My project will hopefully help the wildlife all over the world to live a better and healthier life. I will draft a letter to the president, and after weeks of working on this letter, it will be sent to the president.
United States
Red mangroves filter and clarify the water, protect coastal communities from storm surge, prevent erosion, and provide a shelter for a wide variety of mammals, aquatic species, reptiles and birds. They are also a staple in the diets of the critically endangered Key Deer. Furthermore, evidence shows that mangroves combat global warming by decreasing atmospheric carbon dioxide. Wild Over Wildlife members, Florida International University SEAS, and Lee County 4-H Club members have collected thousands of propagules which are being grown in a variety of homes and in the FIU Shade House. After nine to twelve months, the seedlings will be transplanted to areas along the Gulf and Atlantic shores. We have numerous other non-profit organizations that have collaborated with us for the first two years and we have secured their assistance as the project expands for future plantings. To date, our project has involved more than 100 people including Wild Over Wildlife club members and community service partners. More than 80 hours of community service work has been done by each board member of WOW and others have joined for 6 hour shifts throughout the summer transplants and harvests.

Pages