United States
We will take a tour of the facility/organization and go back at a later date to volunteer to sort seeds.
United States
We work with tribal community elders and culture bearers to document language and tribal ecological knowledge using GIS. We are weaving native cultures into the future!
Haiti
The project would take place in March, April, and May 2017 when Haiti Plunge high school youth teams will be on-site in Haiti to work on the project with their Haitian peers.
Haiti
Planting season in Haiti begins in April. Haiti Plunge Inc. sends teams of high school and college youth to Haiti eight times annually. An American high school team will be in Haiti April 15 - 24, 2016. The team will work with Haitian secondary students from our cooperative to purchase, distribute and assist the children with planting the Mango trees. The team will also teach the children the importance of controlling soil erosion and the relationship of the trees roots to the earth.
Togo
My project will help young people out of poverty since introducing young people to do something with their hand to their lives ganger on site. I WANT THIS PROJECT CAN BE DONE WITH THE SUPPORT OF EVERYONE. with the media on any of these forms of everyone we will succeed this project. with the participation of each of you we will win this project make it happen. this project be done by building a craft and cultural center and the construction of an eco-village on the grounds of one hectare we already have. To strengthen the monitoring of this project we have a volunteer component that strengthens the ability of expertise, support, support by young expatriate world who come here to work on site in the project that will start in January 2016 that we have met the requiert funding for this project in place.
United States
With 20 hours of daylight, the garden flourished in the bush of the Alaskan tundra on the Bering Sea! It was a great success and the fence was secured to keep out the moose, rabbits, dogs and wolves. It was an ongoing process and will continue to be used hopefully for many years. In the long daylight hours of the Alaskan summer, weeds have an excellent opportunity to thrive therefore we taught children how to discern weeds from cultivated plants and some of the "weeds" such as chamomile were harvested and used for tea, food and medicine. It is much work cultivating in the acidic tundra soils however the garden progressed beautifully and with great success. Children are learning, planting, weeding, watering and observing. We worked in the garden several hours a day and Kenkamken's aana (mother in Yup'ik Eskimo language) was welcome to harvest any time although she lived quite a distance from the garden at Lake Aleknagik. "This is your garden" I explained when she visited. While still in mourning for her daughter, she was deeply moved to tears by the Kenkamken Memorial Garden. She was thoroughly touched to be engaged in the garden that bears her daughter's name in Yup'ik language. I told her that she is welcome to have the plaque that I painted and hung on the garden in Kenkamken's memory with the state flower of Alaska, Myosotis, forget-me-not painted on it. Kenkamken's aana took the plaque and I believe it is an inspiration and a blessing for her to continue to cultivate in Kenkamken's memory. Her son, Pipiisiiq will continue to cultivate in his beloved sister's memory as a way to bring comfort and beauty to his family's life. The garden was a meeting place of solace. Some made paintings of the beautiful flowers. Children delighted in hunting for peas, strawberries and spinach leaves (like Popeye consumed for strength!) every day and they loved to see the potato plants push up through the soil. The children so enjoyed tasting fresh chives and sweet baby carrots. Yup'ik elders visited and harvested and shared their ethnobotanical uses of wild harvested plants. We shared with visitors every day and welcomed all. There are some farmers' markets in the town of Dillingham however our garden produce was free! Obtaining nutritious pesticide-free produce is a great challenge in the long winters in Alaska. Many suffer from nutritional deficiencies, which in turn affects physical and mental health. Cultivating in the acidic tundra soils was a great deal of work but the garden developed beautifully, collectively and successfully. The garden will live on……and so will Kenkamken's blessed memory.