United States
We are building 3 bioswales to catch the runoff that is bypassing our school garden. These swales will be planted with nitrogen-fixing plants to build up the depleted soil. Hopefully we'll be catching lots of water from upcoming El Nino events (fingers crossed!) Next we will plant a mix of annuals and perennials in the downslope berms. Eventually, we would like to include plant fruit trees.
United States
This project will get students thinking about real life issues that will have a lasting effect on themselves and the environment. I am hoping that students will then want to talk to family members, friends, and other community members, ultimately using the theme "knowledge is power" to encourage change and awareness. As a final activity, Students will design posters in groups to illustrate their positive message for change, and hope for the future.
United States
We will create aquaponic systems to grow and harvest food and herbs. We will learn about animal habitats and plant life cycle.
United States
We will map our school community identifying current uses and areas where positive change can be inexpensively and efficiently effected. For example, we will contact School District Administration to request rain barrels and downspouts to capture rain run off.
South Africa
We visited our 10 local primary schools that were taught about the environment, as to what it is and what makes up an environment. Amongst others the learners were taught about living things and non-living things that shape up an environment. After elaborating more on that we grouped the learners to have a discussion on what environmental problems are they facing in their communities, they then had to come up with solutions, which amongst the many was a cleaning campaign in their school yard. Thank you to the Bush babies that were able to solve one of the many environmental problems. We also taught them about the human impact on both living and non living factors as we came up with solutions.
United States
Students, and faculty, will become more aware of what an inch of rain is. Collected water will be used to grow, and ultimately harvest, vegetables and ornamental flowers. Rain garden will return rain water to ground instead of asphalt, cement and gutters draining rainfall directly to the ocean.
United States
The Horace Mann Horticulture Club will develop educational materials and plant demonstration mini-gardens in pots to take to the Beverly Hills Farmers Market Earth Day celebration, PTA sponsored events, open house and the LA Environmental Education Fair. We also hope to develop a website to increase the number of people we are able to educate about our campaign...Drought tolerant is beautiful!
United States
The rain garden will filter and soak up the runoff water, so this will prevent erosion, misquote breeding, and beautify the grounds. The rain garden will also provide a space for native plants to flourish which will then provide an environment for native insects. We plan to buy native plants using money raised from school and community fundraisers with approval from our school's administration.
United States
Our photo club will create a variety of small gardens around the school to beautify the environment. We will use current raised flower beds to grow flowers to be transplanted around the campus. The farmer-photographers will document this process and promote this project to all the members of our community.
United States
Our group is working to prepare a resilient garden space. We have a small garden space currently, but are trying to expand the space by building bioswales to catch water and divert water from the upcoming El Nino. The students will plant seeds along the bioswale, and divert the water's path so that rather than flooding, the water can be used to water the garden. The project is a cross-curricular project that includes math, science, and environmental studies. Hopefully, the project will grow to include other classes. For the past few years, Los Angeles has experienced drought, and because of this the ground is hard, and plants have died. This coming winter, Los Angeles is projected to have one of the wettest seasons in recent years. Because the drought has left the ground hard-packed, and the plants whose roots prevented erosion on the hillside have died, our campus is in danger of flooding in several areas. We are working on a larger project because we found that our school sits on a covered arroyo that begins at the local high school. We will map the arroyo's path as part of our project. They will work with local historians and archivists to find the path of water as it would have entered our campus before it was paved over. The students will map the path of water on our campus, and use that to work on the bioswales. Several classrooms are prone to flooding, and the water, when it does rain, eventually ends up in storm drains. The students would like to divert the water to benefit the garden rather than having flooding and runoff. We need tools like shovels and spades to construct, seeds to plant, and a couple of cameras to document where water collects, and to take before and after photos.

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