United States
We can all do this by creating Presentations, Prezi, Tagseto, Glogster, Power Point, Emails, etc.
United States
Check us out at: http://harveygarden.weebly.com Our project will reintroduce flowers native to Michigan (butterfly weed, cardinal flowers, cone flowers, daisies, jack in the pulp, etc.) and have students plant seeds/start it this spring. Hopefully the wide variety of plants will be able to attract insects, especially butterflies, so we can examine and learn more about them. This will add biodiversity to an area that is not supporting any plant life currently. We also hope to involve our friends from lower elementary in maintaining our garden bed and learning about insect life cycles! We have some money set aside to purchase materials and soil, we have some seeds already for the spring, but we do not have enough to complete our project with hardware to build the raised bed/benches. We have also found a guest speaker who will come in to discuss rain gardens with us so we can plan our garden to be as eco-friendly as possible.
France
Due to the grant provided by the Disney Wildlife Conservation Fund, the Jane Goodall Institute was able to purchase a complete honey laboratory, an educational beehive, 60 uniforms for children and 4 beehives with bee colonies, with all the material necessary for the production of honey. In partnership with Ivry’s City Council and a local Bee keepers association (L’APAI), several school classes (+/- 100 children) have visited the beehives and learned about the complex society of the bees. On May 16th, Jane Goodall herself had the opportunity to discover the world of bees from very close by! Since her visit, the bees have produced in a very high quality of 140 kg of honey. This honey has recently been awarded with a Gold Medal of ‘the Best Honey of Ile-de-France Region’! Our educational animations encounter a great success and already 11 Roots & Shoots groups (260 children between the ages of 5 to 11) have subscribed for the next school year 2014-2015 to discover the magic world of bees! www.rootsandshoots.fr
United States
Our garden will replace a patch of grass that consumes thousands of gallons of water every month. This is crucial in Southern California, where we currently have an unprecedented drought. According to our calculations, our garden will only need half the water the lawn drinks up. After scouting this location with local gardening experts and project leaders, we will draw up a layout for the garden, i.e. fences, beds, irrigation, trees, ideal plant layout, etc. We will then acquire the necessary things we need to plant. These include seeds, small plants, lumber, construction materials, and tools. We will try to get as many of these as we can donated by local businesses. Meanwhile, we will be spreading the word and recruiting as many volunteers as we can to help us. The more students we get involved at our school, the more successful our garden will be. We will also target teachers, parents, and community members and ask them to help. This will all be finished by late February. Then, in March, we PLANT! After planting, we will maintain a healthy base of support to ensure the success of our garden in the future. We will host events like gardening days and garden parties to raise awareness about causes like hunger and environmental issues. Our garden will continue to be a beacon for philanthropy and environmental stewardship in our community.
United States
My co-teacher and I are implementing a combined Roots & Shoots and Youth Service America (YSA) project in all of our Living Environment CTT classes (120 students) throughout the Human Impact Unit taught in April-May. We are having students identify the main cause of carbon emissions in the community using the mapping technique developed by Roots & Shoots. We are then having students write and implement community action plans in order to reduce carbon emissions in their community. Finally, students will be graded according to YSA’s 4C model of Career and Workforce Readiness: Communication, Collaboration, Creativity, and Critical Thinking.
Madagascar
We are supporting agricultural project of community-based members to help them increase their yields and thus improving their income
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Start from Spring 2015 till the end of the school year.
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Through the Green Market/Community Gardens Project, we are preparing our youth to step into a brighter tomorrow by teaching them sustainable farming techniques and adapting a lifestyle that’s healthier for our bodies as well as for the Earth. Local agriculture is a topic of great interest, especially in Brevard County. Most of the food we consume is shipped to us on trucks and trains. For many reasons, this is not sustainable for the future. Hydroponics is wonderful way to use assistive technology with our students with disabilities. Our goal is to raise awareness and inspire all students and those in the community to become aware of the benefits that come from locally fresh grown fruits and vegetables. We at Clearlake Education Center want to encourage people to get away from processed foods and get back to the basics while enhancing our environment. We will promote and encourage healthy eating and volunteering within the community. We are committed to saving the environment through recycling, reducing and reusing, keeping our soil rich and preserving our own health by growing organic and eating healthy. The students and faculty will educate our school community on working together to meet our stated goals. We are going green for the benefit of our world and community. Under the direction of Danielle Campbell, students have been involved for the past 9 years in a state-wide recycling project which involved teaching the school community about recycling. This Green Market and Community Gardens Project is a natural next step to apply our learning to discover opportunities for community connection and self-improvement as a self-supporting, school-based enterprise. Students will learn to prepare and sell goods and craft items that they are creating as part of our recycling program. We will also be selling fresh produce grown with Integrated Pest Management principles in hydroponic systems and raised bed community garden. Students learn how to prepare items for market and to display them to attract customers, how to interact with the public and handle money, as well as the economics of bookkeeping, budgeting and running a retail enterprise. The Green Market invites local growers and craftsmen to set up a table and work side-by-side with us, offering a place for the public to purchase items not available in proximity to the Clearlake community. By accepting EBT/SNAP, we will be serving every nearby demographic. Students will work side-by-side with members of the community and have a chance to get their hands in the dirt in our raised-bed gardens. We will invite the community to lease space for a nominal fee and come and grow produce with us in our raised-bed gardens. We have chosen this approach to help avoid some of the common pitfalls of Florida farming, such as soil-borne pathogens, and other pests. Raised bed gardening is less challenging for those with physical limitations; especially the elderly. The therapeutic benefit of gardening is well documented. Fresh air and sunshine are good for overall health and brain function.
United States
Introduction of native milkweed back into our urban landscape. We have planted seeds and will distribute the plants to key areas of our neighborhoods as well as sell the plants along with a micro-lessons on the need to protect and provide for space and protection for pollinators.
United States
Our project will plant native trees. We will also educate the school on the importance of trees to our environment. We will have a school presentation and plant trees around our school campus.

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