Canada
Our school will create a medicine wheel outdoor space in two phases. 1. Hard scaping working with the school forest, wetland and traditional grassy areas and playground to create a nature space. 2. Classroom projects; planning and planting 4 areas, earth, wind, fire and water, to correspond with the medicine wheel. 3. Education, understanding and leading our community of learners through the next years to sustain our water, soil, plants and animals respecting nature and our role and interrelationships within the web to all living and non living elements.
Hong Kong S.A.R., China
Raise awareness in our local and surrounding community. We will have an ariticle published in our local town magazine with a readership of 30,000 people. We will sell Seedlings for seedlings - growing seedlings to sell to our community to raise money for the Kadoorie Conservation China organisation to grow and plant new seedlings in the Bawangling National Nature Reserve. Create a facebook page to raise awareness. Share presentation of Powtoons and keynotes that gives information to other local students and people. Create a website to share our information. Maybe go to Hainan. Design and purchase tshirts (made from bamboo and charcoal) with information on the gibbons and sell them. TELL EVERYONE about the Hainan Black Crested Gibbon.
Ethiopia
Starting off, the students will work in teams to highlight the issue of deforestation and specific effects on local communities--especially farmers, students, and the environment. Then, after drafting papers, they will make presentations among their peers and finally to their community. They will then plan a day of community gathering where they will make their presentations to community leaders and their families and plant tree saplings around their targeted area of their school and a local forest.
United States
I have been collecting recyclable bottles from classrooms in school. Not everyone uses reusable bottles. That should be my next PSA! Each bottle yields 5 cents which I accrue to donate to CoolEarth, a foundation that saves rainforest acreage. I have saved 2.5 acres so far.
Malaysia
An illustrated fictional story book written and illustrated by children for children living in Malaysia that inspires youth-inspired environmental and charitable good deeds big and small on a daily basis. Examples of current environmental disasters, their causes and some solutions will be used in a story that can inspire readers of all ages to take action. Book sale proceeds will go towards charities making a difference in Malaysia and Borneo based on the Roots and Shoots principles. In addition, School-based projects regarding anti-dengue campaign, local tree replanting/anti-flooding proposals to localised construction projects and funding children's homes/orphanages to be discussed as part of Jane Goodall school visit and year 6 term project at my children's school.
Indonesia
Are aims are: 1. Socialisation and Awareness: Get the community involved and to understand why the forest is important and why we need to conserve it; 2. Environmental Education for Schools: Get local schools involved in conservation. Including in-situ activities; develop learning exchanges with children in schools around Indonesia and the world and develop after-school clubs for the local school in the village – with the intention of expanding these to the school in Palangkaraya; 3. Develop an open-access Education Centre: Establishing a centre in the village. This would be a drop-in centre for schools; a nursery and demonstration site. This would also host exhibitions describing the community patrol team’s work, could host a Dayak cultural exhibition and be a site for after-school activities; 4. Explore the potential for developing a Dayak Cultural Education Initiative. Some of the best protected forests in Kalimantan are those where the forest conservation is driven by Dayak communities and a cultural determination to stop over-exploitation of their natural heritage. Dayak people place a high importance on the forests in the culture, although these are often different values to the one that westerners derive from the forest. Dayak people see the forest as a source of products, of fish and water, meat and medicines, timber for their houses and rattan for their nets. For many communities it is also the place their ancestors spirits go after they die. However much of Dayak lore and Dayak knowledge is being lost as the province develops and cities become the focus more than the jungle. Yet as we have seen, Dayak culture is a strong force for forest protection. It may be desirable to develop a Dayak education project, one which teaches about traditions, dance and music, history and the importance of the environment.
Japan
Clean the forest and try to find the relationship among the fallen leaves,weeds,trees and animals.
United States
We are creating a walking tour through the Garden highlighting 25 plants that have engaging animal stories. The stories share information such as how a particular animal pollinates the plant, uses it for food or shelter or any co-evolution stories we have. The self-guided tour will be handed out to visitors at the entrance and each plant will have a marker in the shape of the animal in represents to encourage visitors to think about plants as they would be used in their native environments and bring the discussion of animals into the Botanical Garden.
United States
With 20 hours of daylight, the garden flourished in the bush of the Alaskan tundra on the Bering Sea! It was a great success and the fence was secured to keep out the moose, rabbits, dogs and wolves. It was an ongoing process and will continue to be used hopefully for many years. In the long daylight hours of the Alaskan summer, weeds have an excellent opportunity to thrive therefore we taught children how to discern weeds from cultivated plants and some of the "weeds" such as chamomile were harvested and used for tea, food and medicine. It is much work cultivating in the acidic tundra soils however the garden progressed beautifully and with great success. Children are learning, planting, weeding, watering and observing. We worked in the garden several hours a day and Kenkamken's aana (mother in Yup'ik Eskimo language) was welcome to harvest any time although she lived quite a distance from the garden at Lake Aleknagik. "This is your garden" I explained when she visited. While still in mourning for her daughter, she was deeply moved to tears by the Kenkamken Memorial Garden. She was thoroughly touched to be engaged in the garden that bears her daughter's name in Yup'ik language. I told her that she is welcome to have the plaque that I painted and hung on the garden in Kenkamken's memory with the state flower of Alaska, Myosotis, forget-me-not painted on it. Kenkamken's aana took the plaque and I believe it is an inspiration and a blessing for her to continue to cultivate in Kenkamken's memory. Her son, Pipiisiiq will continue to cultivate in his beloved sister's memory as a way to bring comfort and beauty to his family's life. The garden was a meeting place of solace. Some made paintings of the beautiful flowers. Children delighted in hunting for peas, strawberries and spinach leaves (like Popeye consumed for strength!) every day and they loved to see the potato plants push up through the soil. The children so enjoyed tasting fresh chives and sweet baby carrots. Yup'ik elders visited and harvested and shared their ethnobotanical uses of wild harvested plants. We shared with visitors every day and welcomed all. There are some farmers' markets in the town of Dillingham however our garden produce was free! Obtaining nutritious pesticide-free produce is a great challenge in the long winters in Alaska. Many suffer from nutritional deficiencies, which in turn affects physical and mental health. Cultivating in the acidic tundra soils was a great deal of work but the garden developed beautifully, collectively and successfully. The garden will live on……and so will Kenkamken's blessed memory.
United States
I would like to create a California native plant /xeriscape (low water use) park, that will provide habitat to our diverse wildlife, as well as a learning tool to educate the community on the importance of eliminating the use of Turf grass in landscapes to conserve water. I will accomplish this by helping to organize a team of landscape architects, volunteers, and donors from varying fields whom may share in my vision of a place that I like to call. the Freelands park Thank you, Jerred Branch *I am NOT writing as a representative of RSABG

Pages