United States
Our initial step is to acquire vertical planters, plant growth medium, water testing equipment, and plant nutrient solutions. These materials will constructed within the already-existing structure of the hydroponic system at Pizzo Elementary. University students have already begun and will continue a series of educational lessons and activities in the 1st grade class, to explain the importance of sustainable gardening and to give the students a sense of ownership of their project. In Spring 2015, herbs and spices will be planted as seeds in the classroom and monitored by the students. Once mature, the seedling will be transplanted to the vertical planters and the students will care for them in their hydroponic garden. In Fall 2015, larger vegetables will be planted in the same way and will thus be added to the burgeoning garden. Hands-on educational activities both in the classroom and in the garden will continue once the garden has been established.
United States
We will continue to live as sustainably as we possibly can, which for us means that if we take something from the Earth, like organic fruits or vegetables that we grow, we return something, like vermicompost. If we want to observe the life cycles of monarch and other butterflies, we plant hosts to attract them and place them in our mariposario where they can live in a safe environment. If we want to give thanks for all that our community provides, we offer art, our ears and hearts, a chance to reuse clothes and educational toys and games, education, and our voices to support that community.
Puerto Rico
We are currently working to open up space for new trees and our future interpretative trail. In collaboration with the neighboring campus of the University of Puerto Rico and its professors and students , we will design and build the trail. Students, parents and teachers will work together to plant the new trees and create a new set of garden beds as part of our Tropical Food Forest. Some trees have been donated as well as the tools used in both projects.
United States
We will feed people, organize garden upkeep, planting, harvesting. We will work with The Butterfly Pavilion.
United States
Sprouts aims to achieve its mission through a once-a-week after-school program. During Sprouts club hours, students will learn sustainability through the creation of a permaculture edible garden and the practice of the 3 R's (Reducing, Re-using and Recycling) in and around the school premises with partners like Terracycle.
United States
Build raised garden beds at our main branch so members will have a hands-on experience growing their own plants and learning about gardening and vegetables.
United States
The project involves working with the local forest preserve district. The land is secured, and some trees and perennials have already been planted. Next is to meet with all who are interested in leading the way, plan the over all design and plant.
Canada
At Discover the Outdoors we will provide outdoor educational programs and opportunities for children, families and adults alike to learn and (re)discover nature for better health and well being. Our all ages programs will include activities for health and wellness: snowshoeing, hiking, running, gardening, and climbing; educational programs: learning about plants, animals, farming and food production, gardening; and explore spirit/connection to something greater than ourselves through yoga, creativity, community building, nature and meditation. We will connect and collaborate with other programs and organizations across Alberta, Canada and the world. All programs will encourage physical activity, exploring nature, and connecting to oneself, others and to the natural world. Some examples of a program are: EXAMPLE 1: It is a bright sunny wintery day and families have just arrived at the farm for a day of snowshoeing, bird feeders and adventure. Families enter the Discovery Centre and make bird feeders. After, they snowshoe into the forest to hang their feeder while watching chickadees, woodpeckers and nuthatches enjoying a snack. After snowshoeing, families return to the Discovery Centre to enjoy a warm beverage, a bowl full of hot soup (special made from the fall harvest) and freshly baked bread. After lunch, families have a choice of learning more about winter animals, going outside or enjoy a some quiet reflection time indoors (ie.yoga/meditation). As the sun sets smiling families head home with a new sense of connection to each other and nature. EXAMPLE 2: It is a quiet spring morning and the sun rises in the east. After a year of struggle with illness a man rises to enjoy a quiet walk around the property with his cup of tea. The man reaches the garden and pulls a few weeds, picks a few carrots to eat, and sits down on a bench to absorb the morning sun. After a time he returns to the Discovery Centre where he participates in a morning meditation and yoga class about Loving-Kindness and joins in to help make breakfast for himself and the others who are participating in a weekend retreat about End of Life. After a nourishing and food-to-table breakfast with community the group learn various contemplative practices to help in their journey before heading out to enjoy a walk and conversation. After another healthy lunch participants engage in a "tell your story" project where they find creative ways to tell their story in their own way - art, poetry, song, scrapbooking... EXAMPLE 3: It's a cool, wet day and teenage girls are huddle inside the workshop ready for an afternoon of creating and connecting. Two woman - one a woodworker and another a welder and industrial designer - have joined forces to teach the girls about power tools, friendship, and connection. Safety procedures are reviewed, projects are established and the sound of power tools fill the air. The girls laughter, chatting and learning is in full force and the woman are inspired by their eagerness to learn and grow.
United States
Our garden will replace a patch of grass that consumes thousands of gallons of water every month. This is crucial in Southern California, where we currently have an unprecedented drought. According to our calculations, our garden will only need half the water the lawn drinks up. After scouting this location with local gardening experts and project leaders, we will draw up a layout for the garden, i.e. fences, beds, irrigation, trees, ideal plant layout, etc. We will then acquire the necessary things we need to plant. These include seeds, small plants, lumber, construction materials, and tools. We will try to get as many of these as we can donated by local businesses. Meanwhile, we will be spreading the word and recruiting as many volunteers as we can to help us. The more students we get involved at our school, the more successful our garden will be. We will also target teachers, parents, and community members and ask them to help. This will all be finished by late February. Then, in March, we PLANT! After planting, we will maintain a healthy base of support to ensure the success of our garden in the future. We will host events like gardening days and garden parties to raise awareness about causes like hunger and environmental issues. Our garden will continue to be a beacon for philanthropy and environmental stewardship in our community.
United States
Through the Green Market/Community Gardens Project, we are preparing our youth to step into a brighter tomorrow by teaching them sustainable farming techniques and adapting a lifestyle that’s healthier for our bodies as well as for the Earth. Local agriculture is a topic of great interest, especially in Brevard County. Most of the food we consume is shipped to us on trucks and trains. For many reasons, this is not sustainable for the future. Hydroponics is wonderful way to use assistive technology with our students with disabilities. Our goal is to raise awareness and inspire all students and those in the community to become aware of the benefits that come from locally fresh grown fruits and vegetables. We at Clearlake Education Center want to encourage people to get away from processed foods and get back to the basics while enhancing our environment. We will promote and encourage healthy eating and volunteering within the community. We are committed to saving the environment through recycling, reducing and reusing, keeping our soil rich and preserving our own health by growing organic and eating healthy. The students and faculty will educate our school community on working together to meet our stated goals. We are going green for the benefit of our world and community. Under the direction of Danielle Campbell, students have been involved for the past 9 years in a state-wide recycling project which involved teaching the school community about recycling. This Green Market and Community Gardens Project is a natural next step to apply our learning to discover opportunities for community connection and self-improvement as a self-supporting, school-based enterprise. Students will learn to prepare and sell goods and craft items that they are creating as part of our recycling program. We will also be selling fresh produce grown with Integrated Pest Management principles in hydroponic systems and raised bed community garden. Students learn how to prepare items for market and to display them to attract customers, how to interact with the public and handle money, as well as the economics of bookkeeping, budgeting and running a retail enterprise. The Green Market invites local growers and craftsmen to set up a table and work side-by-side with us, offering a place for the public to purchase items not available in proximity to the Clearlake community. By accepting EBT/SNAP, we will be serving every nearby demographic. Students will work side-by-side with members of the community and have a chance to get their hands in the dirt in our raised-bed gardens. We will invite the community to lease space for a nominal fee and come and grow produce with us in our raised-bed gardens. We have chosen this approach to help avoid some of the common pitfalls of Florida farming, such as soil-borne pathogens, and other pests. Raised bed gardening is less challenging for those with physical limitations; especially the elderly. The therapeutic benefit of gardening is well documented. Fresh air and sunshine are good for overall health and brain function.

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