United States
Our garden will replace a patch of grass that consumes thousands of gallons of water every month. This is crucial in Southern California, where we currently have an unprecedented drought. According to our calculations, our garden will only need half the water the lawn drinks up. After scouting this location with local gardening experts and project leaders, we will draw up a layout for the garden, i.e. fences, beds, irrigation, trees, ideal plant layout, etc. We will then acquire the necessary things we need to plant. These include seeds, small plants, lumber, construction materials, and tools. We will try to get as many of these as we can donated by local businesses. Meanwhile, we will be spreading the word and recruiting as many volunteers as we can to help us. The more students we get involved at our school, the more successful our garden will be. We will also target teachers, parents, and community members and ask them to help. This will all be finished by late February. Then, in March, we PLANT! After planting, we will maintain a healthy base of support to ensure the success of our garden in the future. We will host events like gardening days and garden parties to raise awareness about causes like hunger and environmental issues. Our garden will continue to be a beacon for philanthropy and environmental stewardship in our community.
United States
Through the Green Market/Community Gardens Project, we are preparing our youth to step into a brighter tomorrow by teaching them sustainable farming techniques and adapting a lifestyle that’s healthier for our bodies as well as for the Earth. Local agriculture is a topic of great interest, especially in Brevard County. Most of the food we consume is shipped to us on trucks and trains. For many reasons, this is not sustainable for the future. Hydroponics is wonderful way to use assistive technology with our students with disabilities. Our goal is to raise awareness and inspire all students and those in the community to become aware of the benefits that come from locally fresh grown fruits and vegetables. We at Clearlake Education Center want to encourage people to get away from processed foods and get back to the basics while enhancing our environment. We will promote and encourage healthy eating and volunteering within the community. We are committed to saving the environment through recycling, reducing and reusing, keeping our soil rich and preserving our own health by growing organic and eating healthy. The students and faculty will educate our school community on working together to meet our stated goals. We are going green for the benefit of our world and community. Under the direction of Danielle Campbell, students have been involved for the past 9 years in a state-wide recycling project which involved teaching the school community about recycling. This Green Market and Community Gardens Project is a natural next step to apply our learning to discover opportunities for community connection and self-improvement as a self-supporting, school-based enterprise. Students will learn to prepare and sell goods and craft items that they are creating as part of our recycling program. We will also be selling fresh produce grown with Integrated Pest Management principles in hydroponic systems and raised bed community garden. Students learn how to prepare items for market and to display them to attract customers, how to interact with the public and handle money, as well as the economics of bookkeeping, budgeting and running a retail enterprise. The Green Market invites local growers and craftsmen to set up a table and work side-by-side with us, offering a place for the public to purchase items not available in proximity to the Clearlake community. By accepting EBT/SNAP, we will be serving every nearby demographic. Students will work side-by-side with members of the community and have a chance to get their hands in the dirt in our raised-bed gardens. We will invite the community to lease space for a nominal fee and come and grow produce with us in our raised-bed gardens. We have chosen this approach to help avoid some of the common pitfalls of Florida farming, such as soil-borne pathogens, and other pests. Raised bed gardening is less challenging for those with physical limitations; especially the elderly. The therapeutic benefit of gardening is well documented. Fresh air and sunshine are good for overall health and brain function.
United States
Introduction of native milkweed back into our urban landscape. We have planted seeds and will distribute the plants to key areas of our neighborhoods as well as sell the plants along with a micro-lessons on the need to protect and provide for space and protection for pollinators.
United States
To teach sustainable processes anyone can do at home to grow healthy food year round.
United States
My project is long-term, and has already begun. Late last spring I had planted corn crops for the first time in my life. I had no experience back then so I did not get the best crop results, but they were decent. Then I had realized that you can legally make fuel out of corn that is safe to use at home. At the same time you can also eat the corn, and dry some kernels for a new crop. Growing just corn is a highly efficient crop to grow because of the many uses. Recently I have had the desire to grow edible plants from the seed. Apples are one of my favorite fruits, and I learned how to grow them too. You take the seeds, put them in a moist paper towel, and let them in the fridge until they sprout. Then you place them in a pot, and the trunk will start. This way you will get a decent amount of wood, and lots of delicious apples which you can donate to the local food bank!
India
we do this through a project namely SEED(student empowerment for environmental development).it is divided into three .they are blue,green and white.blue stands for water conservation,green stands for plants and white for cleanliness. it is widely spread in many schools.I am alsio a member of SEED.In each school there will be a co-ordinator .In our school,under the coordinator we formed a club.we palnt trees,we make some awareness programmes and as SEED members we do conservation in our own ways.
United States
Each class in our school will take turns cleaning and preparing the ground, planting the seeds, weeding the garden, and watering the garden.
United States
The children will plants seeds and water them and eventually be able to eat what they have grown! We will share the fruits of our labor with our community. Also, we will learn ways to recycle water and not waste it! Needed to start: planting soil, seeds or small plants, watering cans, gardening tools!
United States
With 20 hours of daylight, the garden flourished in the bush of the Alaskan tundra on the Bering Sea! It was a great success and the fence was secured to keep out the moose, rabbits, dogs and wolves. It was an ongoing process and will continue to be used hopefully for many years. In the long daylight hours of the Alaskan summer, weeds have an excellent opportunity to thrive therefore we taught children how to discern weeds from cultivated plants and some of the "weeds" such as chamomile were harvested and used for tea, food and medicine. It is much work cultivating in the acidic tundra soils however the garden progressed beautifully and with great success. Children are learning, planting, weeding, watering and observing. We worked in the garden several hours a day and Kenkamken's aana (mother in Yup'ik Eskimo language) was welcome to harvest any time although she lived quite a distance from the garden at Lake Aleknagik. "This is your garden" I explained when she visited. While still in mourning for her daughter, she was deeply moved to tears by the Kenkamken Memorial Garden. She was thoroughly touched to be engaged in the garden that bears her daughter's name in Yup'ik language. I told her that she is welcome to have the plaque that I painted and hung on the garden in Kenkamken's memory with the state flower of Alaska, Myosotis, forget-me-not painted on it. Kenkamken's aana took the plaque and I believe it is an inspiration and a blessing for her to continue to cultivate in Kenkamken's memory. Her son, Pipiisiiq will continue to cultivate in his beloved sister's memory as a way to bring comfort and beauty to his family's life. The garden was a meeting place of solace. Some made paintings of the beautiful flowers. Children delighted in hunting for peas, strawberries and spinach leaves (like Popeye consumed for strength!) every day and they loved to see the potato plants push up through the soil. The children so enjoyed tasting fresh chives and sweet baby carrots. Yup'ik elders visited and harvested and shared their ethnobotanical uses of wild harvested plants. We shared with visitors every day and welcomed all. There are some farmers' markets in the town of Dillingham however our garden produce was free! Obtaining nutritious pesticide-free produce is a great challenge in the long winters in Alaska. Many suffer from nutritional deficiencies, which in turn affects physical and mental health. Cultivating in the acidic tundra soils was a great deal of work but the garden developed beautifully, collectively and successfully. The garden will live on……and so will Kenkamken's blessed memory.
Tanzania
WE WISH TO START ON JULY, NOW WE ARE READ ORGANIZING YOUTHS GROUPS WITH MORE THAN 300 YOUTHS, WE START BY PROVIDING EDUCATION

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