United States
Our club will comb through the power white beach sand and remove any and all trash/ litter/ and debris and either recycle the items if applicable or dispose of properly.
United States
We have started to plan it and make posters advertising to our school to come. Also we are asking the science teachers if they will offer extra credit if people to come as an incentive.
United States
We are going to watch videos on the severity of the pollution in our waters, and discuss the videos. Next, we have developed a game where the kids will make fish bags, and "eat" bottle caps from the water. Some bottle caps represent food and some represent pollution. The kids will not be told which bottle caps represent food and which represent pollution. After all the kids have filled their fish with "food" we will determine how many healthy v/s unhealthy fish were in our waterway. The rough ratio of bottle caps is 2 parts good food, one part pollution. Next, we will take our fish on a nature walk and have them put various items in their bags. The stuff they pick up will be used to show how easy it is to pollute water, but how hard it is to clean up the water once it has been polluted. We will make water filters from two liter bottles, coffee filters, cotton balls, sand and rocks and see just how clean we can get the water that we pollute. Would also like to take a trip to the local waste water treatment plant.
Turkey
We hope to encourage and teach our children to pick up their rubbish at the beach and any other rubbish they see.Also for them to get into the habit of explaining to their friends ,family members and neighbours why they are doing this ,The project will be backed up by posters and videos in the classes to give the children as much background knowledge as possible
United States
Our project will raise awareness of Salt Cedar impact to our local water resources by posting facts about Salt Cedars by a trail that connects to one of our most frequented parks. We also want to coordinate tree removal projects that local business and residents can volunteer and participate in to reduce Salt Cedar populations in our community. We hope this will be a step towards restoring our native water ecosystems and increase the water resource stores in our community.
United States
We will create posters to voice out what we need to do on the sources of water.
United States
We will meet at the park and clean up any trash or fishing line we might see. We will also help any horseshoe crab that might be on their backs. We will discuss the issues facing the lagoon and discuss recent horseshoe crab deaths and theories related to the problems.
United States
Participated in the annual stream cleanup with 97 others on the Brandywine Creek.
Canada
Create awarness among my community, raise money for Omo Child in Ethiopia Presentation on Ethiopia/ Omo Child
United States
Summary: Our Roots and Shoots Chapter attended a "Adopt-A-Mangrove" workshop put on by the Brevard Zoo. We learned about all the ways Mangroves benefit the Indian River Lagoon. We each took home small mangrove seedlings to nurture and will bring our mangroves back for a shoreline planting once they are mature enough to do well in wild. We will also share our knowledge with our schools and community. This is what we learned: Why Mangroves are Important … • Mangroves provide habitat (food, shelter, air and water) and a nursery for many important wildlife. Approximately 90% of our commercial seafood and 70% of local game fish spend some part of their lives in a mangrove wetland. The roots of the mangroves provide protection for numerous species, such as snook, snapper, tarpon, jack, sheepshead, red drum, oysters, shrimp, crabs and mollusks. Above the water, mangroves serve as a safe place for water birds, such as brown pelicans, roseate spoonbills, and several egret and heron species. They provide a resting place for birds of prey, song birds and migratory birds as they travel the Atlantic flyway. • Mangroves produce food. As mangrove leaves fall, bacteria and fungi begin to turn the leaves into a rich source of food known as detritus within hours. Worms, shrimp, crabs, mullet and many other animals feed off the detritus. • Mangroves enhance the quality of our local waters by trapping and cycling pollutants, filtering sediments and absorbing excessive nutrients resulting from storm water runoff. • Mangroves help stabilize our local shores from erosion during storms. The roots of the mangroves help trap sediment and keep the shoreline intact. They act as a buffer, reducing storm surge and high wind. • Mangroves provide approx. 50% of Florida’s oxygen. Most importantly, we learned that mangrove survival is in our hands! Mangroves have been removed extensively for development, and pollution and freezes have taken their toll. It is estimated that 85% have been lost since the 1940’s. We can help by replanting mature mangroves and helping get rid of invasive plants. We can also help by spreading the word! Home Location Calendar Gift Shop Our Sponsors Contact Education EcoTours Restoration Camps . 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"To protect and restore the Florida coastal and Indian River Lagoon ecosystems through education, research and community stewardship." Mangroves “The Salt-Loving Plant’’ Red Mangrove PropugulesBlue Heron in Black MangrovesBlack Mangrove Why Mangroves are Important … • Mangroves provide habitat (food, shelter, air and water) and a nursery for many important estuarine creatures. Approximately 90% of our commercial seafood and 70% of local game fish spend some part of their lives in a mangrove wetland. The roots of the mangroves provide protection for numerous species, such as snook, snapper, tarpon, jack, sheepshead, red drum, oysters, shrimp, crabs and mollusks. Above the water, mangroves serve as rookeries for water birds, such as brown pelicans, roseate spoonbills, and several egret and heron species. They provide a resting place for birds of prey, song birds and migratory birds as they travel the Atlantic flyway. • Mangroves produce food. As mangrove leaves fall, bacteria and fungi begin to turn the leaves into a rich source of food known as detritus within hours. Worms, shrimp, crabs, mullet and many other animals feed off the detritus. This results in a concentration of prey items for predators who are looking for these invertebrates and herbivorous fish. • Mangroves enhance the quality of our local waters by trapping and cycling pollutants, filtering sediments and absorbing excessive nutrients resulting from storm water runoff. • Mangroves help stabilize our local shores from erosion during storms. The roots of the mangroves help trap sediment and keep the shoreline intact. They act as a buffer, reducing storm surge and high wind. • Mangroves provide approx. 50% of Florida’s oxygen. Mangrove survival is in our hands. Mangroves are a vital part of our local salt marsh ecosystem. They have been removed extensively for development, and pollution and freezes have taken their toll. It is estimated that 85% have been lost since the 1940’s.They are federally protected today, and cannot be trimmed or removed without a permit. Here are a few ways you can help: Increase the green – Increase the natural areas on your property by removing impervious surfaces (concrete and asphalt) and replacing them with surfaces that will allow rainwater to filter into the aquifer. This will decrease the amount of pollutants that enter into our local waters. Support projects that maintain natural shorelines as opposed to sea walls and other forms of hard armoring. A natural shoreline will contain both mangrove and oyster communities. These communities will serve as a natural defense against erosion and help increase biological diversity in our local waters. Get involved in local Mangrove planting and Invasive Species removal projects held throughout the year. Help spread the word. Whether you’re a fisherman, boater or passerby, all of us depend on a healthy mangrove ecosystem here in Volusia County. CLICK HERE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT CENTRAL FLORIDA MANGROVES . . . (386) 428-4828 520 Barracuda Blvd. New Smyrna Beach, FL 32169 View Location Map © 1998-2015 The Marine Discovery Center, Inc. All Rights Reserved The Marine Discovery Center, Inc. is a membership-driven, not-for-profit, 501 (c) 3 Florida Corporation This Site Maintained by Lois Reed Designs & is a Phycel Designs Custom Creation Receive email updates from MDC Email: Donate to Marine Discovery Center Book your tour online book now Information Links •MDC Directors •Marine Discovery Membership •Donate •Photo Gallery •Annual Reports •Sitemap •Links •Our Sponsors . . . .

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