United Arab Emirates
We would love to promote the Great Barrier Reef around our school body and the country we live in. There are many ways to do this, we could hold more video conferences with Reef HQ to discuss the problems and how we can help, we could hold an assembly to present our ideas to this school and our year. Furthermore in the future it would be amazing if we can visit the GBR and participate in activities to promote not only in my country, the UAE, but also in Australia.
United Arab Emirates
The main company, Reef HQ, is located in Australia close to the Great Barrier. Therefore, it would be helpful to do some more video conferences with the company. Also it would be handy to hold an assembly about getting involved with Reef HQ and saving the lives of Dugongs. On national day we could perhaps share some information with the school because national day would link with sustainability.
Canada
We have so far done: Information sessions, brainstorming, community cleanups, environmental school theme days, collaborations with student council, and bake sales. In the future we are hoping to do so much more.
United States
Clean up Dempster St beach and classify materials.
United States
It will organize projects and presentations to bring attention to the cause.
United States
Our project will hopefully stop some pollution from evading our waters. We will hold bakesales, create a video to show, and speak to others about this issue. Hopefully, together, we can stop some of this. If you would like to watch our video, go to https://biteable.com/watch/ocean-life-matters-1382120 now!
United States
Through a hands on interactive learning experience about these animals, our group members will help educate local communities about the impact native New England wildlife has on ecosystems and current wildlife "management" techniques. It will also demonstrate what occurs when animals are hunted to extinction or pushed out of their habitat, highlighting the loss of the gray wolf in New England.
United States
We will learn more about marine mammals of the Arctic and use our community's Festival of Tree program to bring this information to individuals and families in our communities. To do this, we selected a children's picture book that focused on Arctic Marine Mammals and displayed it along side a decorated tree. This book contained many resources for more information in an appealing way to all ages. We decorated the tree with hand crafted, eco-friendly Arctic marine mammals and landscapes.
United States
We will first clean up! We need to remove tires that get washed up in our Indian kettle rock formation on the shore. We need to clean up trash that flies onto our property or gets left behind by students and faculty. We will remove invasive plants like poison ivy and neighboring ornamentals to make more room for our native plants like Juneberries and sassafras. Then we will add new ones like native grasses and blueberry bushes so our bird friends have snacks. We will add pollinator plants to support bees and butterflies and bat shelters. We are putting in 6 container gardens for our human friends too. We will grow edibles for the local food pantry and flowers for our neighbors in retirement homes. We have invited our civic association and neighbors to come garden with us too. We will celebrate with pizzas made with our homegrown ingredients at the end of the growing season.
United States
Sprouts club members will be planting, caring for and harvesting fruits and vegetables from our garden from spring 2016- until Spring 2018. In the process, they will learn what produce is available at what time of the year and how specific edible and pollinator plants grow. They will also learn the needs of plants and how they are not isolated but are a part of a complex system that is relatively easy to maintain. FIRST-DAY of SPROUTS 2017-2018 We are now in the fall school year 2017-2018 and we have harvested several crops from the student garden beds. Wednesday, Sept 6, was the first day of our Sprouts Club. We met at Mrs. Kelly Anderson's 5th-grade classroom after school and discovered a new healthy snack: figs! The scraps from our snacks were collected and used to feed red wriggler worms in our worm tower. This way, nothing was wasted! Students, teachers, and parents harvested tomatoes, long beans, green beans and basil. They even braved the rain to do it! Another group of students created signs to label the garden beds with, thanks to a project of an Eagle Scout candidate and an assistant teacher, Mrs. Angela Gomez. A final group of students looked at an initial map of the garden beds and identified what was in the garden. This was their orientation to mapping. All students used old student notebooks whose pages were still unused. That way, we saved on trees and money! At the end of the day, we took a closer look at the produce we harvested and sketched them (and the worms) in our notebooks. It was a busy first day!

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