United States
Our main goals was to raise awareness in our neighborhood for the plight of the apes... We advertised... got people interested, went door-to-door with flyers... We got the idea to do a fundraiser because lots of people don't know, especially in a place like VT! We decided it'd be a good way to spread the word, and start a school-club as well as the international organization. I learned that you can dream big, and achieve what you want if you try. It was really inspiring that us, 11-year-olds, were spending their weekend... doing what they love, and sharing their passion. We raised $300, and are really happy with the results....
United States
HUB (www.hubhub.org) was working with local families to help get them on their feet. One widowed mom wanted to homeschool her kids. A mama in our group was contacted to be a part of the "reveal" day. She put together information, contacts and calendars of events - all relating to homeschooling. She worked hard researching, and asking people on all our homeschool e-groups to come help, donate books, or be willing to be local contacts for her. On the 4th, she & her 7-year-old joined HUB, and presented everything to the family. We are so proud of them!
United States
In December, for a Roots & Shoots project, the other homeschoolers and I went to a nursing home. We went to the nursing home to plant a garden. We planted the garden for the people because they had a big coutyard with nothing in it and we thought it would be a great place for a garden. Well, it wasn't completley empty in the courtyard. There were four big raised planters with nothing in them. The planters were raised so the people didn't have to bend down. We had planted herb, flower, and vegetable seeds earlier and now they were big enough to plant. We put flowers that would attract butterflies in two of the planters. In the two empty planters we put herbs in one and vegetables in the other. Afterwards we ate cookies and drank juice. Some of the kids even sang songs with the people that lived there. I was nervous when we first got there, but when we were done I knew we had done a good thing.
Malaysia
In Roots & Shoots, our teacher started talking about the Chin Refugees. She said we could write a book, do a toy drive, or make our own educational toy. I decided to write a book. Actually, I decided to write three books: The Alien Invasion, The Sandwich That Could Walk, and The Orangutan Who Went To School. My main goal was to have them all written. The reason I chose to write my own book(s) was because I have always wanted to be an author. Sadly though, time flew by a wee bit too quickly, and I only wrote one book. The Orangutan Who Went To School was turned into a reality on March 20th, 2008. After the principal and I read it to the entire school, I went to the Chin Refugees, and I read my book to them. Another member has almost finished writing a book.
Malaysia
The Roots & Shoots club of the International School of Kuala Lumpur (ISKL) held a toy drive for the Chin refugees, a group of poor refugees from Myanmar. They cannot work, because they do not have work permits, so they cannot raise money for themselves. We made posters and asked for people to send in new or gently used toys, books, and clothes for this unfortunate group of people. The toy drive was a success, and we collected about 20 bags of goods.
United States
Our goal was to provide the public with an opportunity to learn about ways to save our natural resources while having fun. We had almost 60 exhibitors, musicians, arts & crafts, games & food. We estimate we had around 800 people come to this event this year. To raise money we held a silent auction from in-kind donations received, and sold water, soda & an organic cotton tee shirt that was designed for the day. This project took many hours of volunteer time, but we felt people left the event empowered with tangible ideas as to what they personally could do to live more simply & sustainably. This is the second year we've organized an Earth Day Celebration and it has helped us gain name recognition in a very positive way.
United States
The kids became interested in the red panda after reading a book about endangered species. As a group, they researched and made a hard cover book about the red panda, which gave them the idea to sell the book and raise money to help save the red panda. The kids came up with the idea to bring in books from home that they didn't want anymore and sell them during a school event when parents would be there. They advertised, priced books, baked treats to sell along with the books, and practiced making change so that they could handle the money. During the sale, the children also answered many questions about the red panda. The kids stayed to clean up the entire area, wash dishes, and count their money. They were pleased with the amount of money! We looked up ways to help the red panda with the funds, and found the Red Panda Project that would accept the donation and offer the kids a way to be connected with their efforts. They all completed the requirements to become "Red Panda Rangers" by answering certain questions (which led to some geography work) and even got badges to reward their efforts. They also got a certificate with a picture of the panda they helped save. This was quite a bit of work for young kids, but well worth it!
United States
Our school recently lost a playing field to a parking lot expansion, and we were in session when the two Scotch Pine trees were bulldozed to the ground. The kids were devastated and wanted to take some action. The plan was to raise enough money to plant trees to replace the ones that were destroyed so that we made sure that we still had good air around the school (we were also learning about how trees help give us oxygen). We planned a book sale of used books where we also sold snacks during another school event when there would be lots of parents there. We had done another sale similar to this the previous year, but with a different focus. The students learned about money, transactions, pricing books to sell, arranging the books attractively, and cleaning up after the fun! They felt good that they were taking some action after being so upset about the parking lot on their playing field.
United States
The Pioneer Roots & Shoots after school group meets weekly throughout the school year to learn, develop compassion and take action. This year our final project was for the environment. We received a grant to plant a berry garden in a barren spot of the schoolyard as part of our outdoor classroom. In previous years our Roots & Shoots built and planted a butterfly garden and planted an orchard, both in our schoolyard. Gardening improves environmental attitudes and understanding. Experiences such as watching a seedling change into a plant, witnessing the death of a neglected plant, seeing fruit emerge from a tree in the fall, raising a garden for butterflies help students acquire a direct, personal understanding of what living things require to thrive, and how they adapt and interact. Watching plants grow and bear fruit and berries can increase self-esteem, self-worth and a sense of pride of their accomplishments. Planting and gardening connects students with the natural world and improves attitudes toward the environment. A school garden brings teachers one more creative and energizing methodology that helps promote the development of the whole child. We also hope to encourage children to make health-based food choices that are tasty and fun. There is no better place than a garden to engage children in conversation about healthy eating and maybe even inspire a future organic farmer or two in the process!
United States
Each year our school hangs up a tree around Christmas time with apples on it listing items that a child in the community would like to have for the holidays, but won't because his or her family has been affected by domestic violence. Our class had done several projects focused on helping animals, and we were looking for something to do to help the humans around us. The kids came up with this idea after some of their parents had taken an apple off the tree and bought some gifts. Our class collects money from cans we return and put it into our "Human Fund." We had about $75 at the time, and so we chose an apple from the tree and divided up the gifts. The kids got together with a friend and arranged a shopping trip to get their items. They took a lot of pride in choosing exactly what they though this child would want. Several of the children also made cards for him! The kids learned about shopping and coordinating a get-together with their partner in addition to becoming aware of domestic violence and how they can help other kids.

Pages