United States
Our group is made up of homeschool kids and their mamas. Between park days, and field trips, each family packs lunches 4-5 times a week. Recently our group switched to all reusable products! Many of us purchased the stainless steel lunch kits from www.reusablebags.com and www.greenfeet.com, others opted for glass and/or metal containers, and one bought an actual tiffin from Little India. For sandwiches a few families have purchased the sandwich wraps from www.reusablebags.com, but the rest of us stuff them into the lunch kits. The way we drool over their wraps makes me sure we'll all eventually buy our own. Snacks get put into lunch kits, little containers, and sometimes wrapped in fabric napkins. For utensils we have families who use their home silverware, some who use the beautiful bamboo sets from www.reusablebags.com, and one family who cleverly bought camping utensils. Lastly, every family has bought the Kleen Kanteens for water; together we've got all the sizes represented (including a baby brother with his teeny Kanteen, sporting a sippy lid!) As for carrying all of the above? Cloth bags and eco-friendly coolers of course! The children loved picking everything out, and learning why we were making the switch. They've loved showing their items to each other, and to friends not in our group. I'm proud to say we've inspired many in our larger home school community to make the switch!! We're working on bringing empty food containers with us all the time, so we can put restaurant leftovers in them instead of containers to toss in the trash.
United States
We are teaming with the Kids Against Hunger organization to do a one-day food packaging event at our school on April 16, 2007. Kids Against Hunger will deliver all the materials needed to do the food packaging to our school. K-8 students will package the food and then Kids Against Hunger will distribute domestically and overseas. We set a goal of packaging 36,000 servings on April 16th. Our goal has required us to raise about $8500 for transportation and materials. We started raising funds in September 2006. Each student in the school was given a plastic bottle in which to save funds. Students periodically bring the bottles to school so the money can be counted. We have barometers set up around the school to keep track of our progress. We have raised $8100 as of this date.
United States
After a ranger presentation about sharing the trail with snakes of the Sonoran Desert, we hiked along a trail and cleaned up all the trash we could find. A fun activity for all ages!
United States
At an annual statewide home education conference held at Arizona State University, we requested extra recycling bins from the university and created signs that read "Please recycle cans and plastic bottles!" The children placed these signs strategically around the building, especially near all the regular trash cans in each classroom we were occupying. At the end of each day, they collected abandoned water bottles, emptied the water out, and recycled them. Some ASU students, who were volunteering for the conference, really liked the recycling signs and suggested that we leave them up past the end of the conference as a reminder to the college students! Our group, along with two other Arizona homeschool R&S groups, also provided information about Roots & Shoots at an informational table.
United States
Founding group member, Mikal decided to celebrate his eight birthday with a re-vegetation project at Papago Park. Mikal is so enthusiastic about re-vegetation projects, that he asked for a pick-ax for his birthday present, which came in very handy for this project! City of Phoenix Park rangers instructed Mikal and about 25 group members in the removal of invasive buffelgrass. It was hard work in hot temperatures, but when we were done, there were bags full of these invasive weeds, and native cacti in their places that the group planted. In Mikal's words: "I picked the re-vegetation project for my birthday because I like to plant and dig. I've been to re-vegetation projects before at Papago Park, Lost Dog Wash Trail, and Pinnacle Peak Park, and I hope that I can do it again on my next birthday." We wrapped up the celebration with pizza provided by Streets of New York and cake.
Spain
Our family group participated in a event in the Serralada Litoral Park, near Barcelona city. There we performed some educative activities such as: constructing toys with recycled materials and planting trees seeds.
Spain
Our family group visited the springs of one of Catalonia's biggest river, "Llobregat". The road back to home in Barcelona follows exactly the river course, so we could show, teach and raise awareness about: 1) how clean the water appears the coming from the spring and the difference after the river leaves the town 2) quantity of water and how much is needed for the fish 3) what happens after the water goes to the cleaning plant 4) why we can drink spring water but not the water down the river 5) what happens to the water when arriving to the sea
Spain
Our family group participated in the Bird Day in Collserola Park, a natural area very close to Barcelona city (visited by Jane on February 2007). Our activities comprised: 1) construction of different bird feeders with metal wire and peanuts or alternatively with a bag with corn, peanuts, etc. and peanuts butter 2) coloring bird pictures to learn about them 3) return of birds to nature after recovering in the veterinary hospital (owl, falcon, etc.)
United States
Members of the Los Angeles Zoo's "Eco Corps" Roots & Shoots group participated in a food-related enrichment project for chimpanzees. Non-toxic papier mache, made with unbleached paper, flour and water was wrapped around nuts and seeds. It was then attached to branches to create "berries." Bamboo husks were soaked in water to make them pliable, rolled-up with food items and tied together using vines to make "sandwiches." Seeds, nuts, peanut butter and mustard were stuffed into the crevices of pine cones. The enrichment items were hidden throughout the chimpanzee's exhibit to engage the chimps in foraging behavior and mental activity. The students in the Roots & Shoots group were not allowed to enter the chimp exhibit but gathered around the enclosure early one morning, before the chimps were released from their night quarters. They were able to watch zoo keepers hide the enrichment items under branches, behind rocks and in trees. When the chimps entered the exhibit, they almost immediately began searching for the treats, then determined how to break open the papier mache and obtain the food. The Roots & Shoots group learned first-hand about the importance of enrichment projects, and how creating a changing and challenging environment for zoo animals is integral to their well-being.
United States
We are going around our town and picking up garbage in the streets. We are making signs for the local businesses to post in the windows so if our buckets are full we can put the garbage in their garbage cans. These signs say I support Roots & Shoots for the B.I.R.D.S. B.I.R.D.S. stands for Being and Individual, Reaching our Dreams and Sharing them. The group leader is a Licensed Veterinary Technician that works with wildlife and exotic pets. This is an on going project for the community.

Pages