United States
The MYB elementary school Roots & Shoots Club collected leaves for the leaf cutter ant colony at Yale's Peabody Museum of Natural History. We had a great time and learned about some local trees.
United States
At the global youth summit I met two young people from Nepal who are running an animal sanctuary there. My group back home really wanted to help them, so they sent us a large box of hand made crafts and we sold them in the US, all the money went back to help the animals in Nepal. We also sold home made baked goods.
United States
We helped teach kids and their parents about endangered animals, especially island foxes. We helped at crafts booths - face painting, animal tattoos, origami. We also had a pretend voting booth where kids could vote on environmental issues and for president. We encouraged kids to tell their parents to register to vote by Oct. 20 and to vote on Nov. 4.
United States
On Thursday, September 19, 2008 Shirley Mayes Head Start children, parents, and staff flew our Peace Dove in celebration and honor of International Peace Day. Throughout the week teachers discussed with their 3-5 year old preschoolers what peace is and how to practice peace--calm, getting along, working together, sharing, being friends. We also discussed what peace is not. Our preschool serves 126 families. Teachers and children also decorated pinwheels. At the end of the parade, Ms. Stephanie thanked parents and staff for their commitment to promote peace in our school. Ms. Janice rang the bell for peace, and we all declared together, "May peace prevail on earth!" We committed to making our school a place of peace. Throughout the year, we promote peace among students and families. Although we had a special day to celebrate Shirley Mayes Day of Peace, promoting peace is an ongoing commitment we are dedicated to.
United States
We were given an opportunity to partner with Urban Farming, a national organization who help grow community gardens, in creating an Edible wall which provides organic crops for the community. We wanted to teach the community about the importance of eating healthy and the basic skills of growing plants and vegetables. We gather club members to prune weekly and plant new crop for the suitable seasons when it is necessary. The Edible wall has an Irrigation system so we do not need to water it. After doing maintenance work on the wall, the crops that are ready to be harvested are given freely to whoever wants it (students, teachers, parents, custodians, etc.) Working on the wall is such an exhilarating experience because we get to see the vegetables grow in front of our eyes and giving it to our own community who are amazed and grateful in receiving it. Also it is just amazing at how many people there are who wants to help and want to learn how to garden.
New Zealand
We had two planting sessions (the earlier date was August 31, 2008). The 1st time we planted 120 trees and the second time we planted 100 trees. We raised money to bring awareness of our objective to plant locally and support globally as well by asking any amount anyone would like to give. We are a group of four families with a total of 10 children (3-6 year olds). Our goal was to raise awareness of the local need to plant native trees as well as donate to the greater cause in Tanzania through Rebirth the Earth. The city of Christchurch donated the trees and had a ranger help us locate the proper place to plant. We are also using this experience to learn more about trees in our next monthly meeting.
United States
The Zumers hosted a "mock vote" at Peace Day. We made available various facts about the two presidential candidates from the Republic and Democratic parties' views on the environment and community. Then, children and adults were both able to sign a ballot for which views they agreed or disagreed with. For the younger children who didn't know enough about politics yet, they were given a ballot that said 'if you could change the world in one way to bring peace, what would it be?'.
United States
Our Group participated in the Million Acorn Challenge, we collected acorns, soaked them and sorted them and then participated in a reforestation project at a national Park on the Mississippi River. We planted a large area by hand with the acorns collected. We learned about the migratory birds and other wildlife that will be attracted by the area that we planted and how the trees help protect the watershed. We also came to the realization that it takes a lot of work to reforest an area that is clearcut. The Million Acorn Challenge is a five year project and is restoring native oak forests in Minnesota. Our group also learned how to identify Oak trees by leaf and enhanced appreciation of tree cycles.
United States
This was a simple garage sale were group members donated unwanted belongings and we then sold them for a reasonable price.
United States
We have a booth every year at the Roots & Shoots Day of Peace event in Griffith Park. Our chapter discussed things we could do in order to promote peace. We agreed that intelligent and wise leaders are extremely important. The leader that we think would make the world a better place is Barack Obama. One of our members made a portrait of Obama for the art gallery at the festival. A couple of our members made a display board showing how difficult it was for women to acquire the right to vote. We also had a booth that explained how important we think it is to learn about the candidates and issues in the upcoming election. Our display encouraged everyone to register to vote and encouraged them to vote on Nov. 4, 2008. We gave information out about how to register. We also had two pretend voting booths and ballots for kids. After the kids voted, we gave them a "I voted today" sticker. Our booth was very popular. We also helped at other booths, including Reef Check. Reef Check's booth explained how important it is to protect coral reefs. Kids there got to help make a replica of a reef.

Pages