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We attend community events every other Saturday and educate people about Greenhouse Gas emissions. We have a carbon footprint calculator people can use and a pledge that people can check off easy steps they want to take to reduce thier carbon footprint (such as turning off lights whenever leaving a room, turning computers off when not in use, reducing miles driven, etc.). Once someone takes a pledge, we add up how many pounds of CO2 they are pledging to reduce and they get to stamp thier hands in our book with thier signature and how much carbon they are reducing. Then they get to take the pledge home and put it on thier fridge and follow it. At our last 2 events, people pledged to reduce over half a million pounds of carbon emessions at each event!!
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Our group planted pine trees in two areas for Earth Day. We planted 5 trees along a nature trail at a school and 4 near a stream where erosion is a problem. The trees will provide wildlife habitat, help remedy and protect the Chesapeake Bay watershed. The children have continued to care for the trees and all are thriving. The trees were donated by our school. The school had purchased trees for students and had some left over.
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Chelsea Gross and I attended the World Environment Day at the United Nations on Friday, June 1. Dr. Raymond Sommereyns, Mr. James Sniffern and UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon spoke. The keynote speaker was Mr. Andrew Revkin, a writer for the New York Times. His main speaking points included the responsibility that we have due to the knowledge gained in the past two decades concerning climate change, to embrace the understanding of climate change and work to shift behavior through education, the use and implementation of alternative energy including nuclear energy and hybrids and climate change/global warming. There were interactive webcams with exchanges from Yellowknife, Canada; Karachi, Pakistan and Vancouver, British Columbia in which they discussed the improvements they are making in their communities and schools by implementing recycling programs and using energy efficient products. The event was very successful and we met two groups interested in joining Roots & Shoots located in the New York/New Jersey area.
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We gathered trash around our elementary school. We encouraged other groups in the school to join us and had about 30 children/adults participate.
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We targeted the local pond which is next to the high school for a trash pick up. We collected 4 large trash bags in about an hour.
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Roots & Shoots members Nate Kenny and Peyman Mortize planned out a community service project in the school year 2006 (when we first became members of Roots & Shoots. They decided that their school garden needed a greenhouse. They began to do research and collected information. This year, they wrote a grant to Pleasanton School District asking for the money to purchase a greenhouse. The school district was accepting applications for school projects that concerned the environment. The school district accepted the Roots & Shoots proposal and awarded Roots & Shoots $795.00 to buy a greenhouse. The greenhouse has been purchased and delivered, The greenhouse will be set up this summer in the school garden.
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Roots & Shoots sponsored a school wide fundraiser during May. We partnered with the Earth Foundation to save the rainforest in the Rift Valley. Our goal was to save 100 acres. We were able to save almost 50 acres. Roots & Shoots painted signs, classroom presentations, held a school wide assembly activity and a Roadrunner Radio school announcement. The members distributed T-shirts, hats and bags to classrooms.
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Our Kindergarten class wanted to share the important message that we need to take care of our environment today so that we will have it tomorrow. This message was presented by bringing "The Great Kapok Tree" written by Lynn Cherry, to life in the form of a play. The children became the animals in the rain forest and they convinced the man who came to chop down the great Kapok to stop. About 110 people saw the play which was free.
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The Jr. BKS Explorers' Club (with Nancy Barron & Kathryn MacElroy) is an after school program for Kindergarten children. The students work in cooperative groups and participate in peer learning. The Kindergarten students plant bulbs outside their classroom windows in the fall and watch with anticipation for their appearance in the spring. The children use age appropriate gardening tools to rake up leaves and pick up trash in the school's yard. Kindergarten students realize that they can make a difference in the world as they learn about environmental issues in their neighborhood. The children visit the Trailside Museum to observe injured indigenous animals.
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The children in each Kindergarten class adopted a child and purchased age appropriate toys and books to be placed in a stocking. The stockings were given to ALTRUSA, an international organization, for distribution to the children. Filling Christmas stockings helped Quincy's neediest children.

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