United States
Our group collected 3 bags of trash along the Campbell Creek and creek trail in Anchorage, Alaska. Members worked on various other days to collect another 18 bags of trash around town. It was wonderful to see an immediate improvement in our city. The great kids in our group have continued to pick up trash throughout the summer and have learned that it is important to keep our earth clean and beautiful.
United States
Four families initiated at-home projects to include: using more organic food via a Community Supported Agriculture program, switching to compact fluorescent light bulbs, recycling as many items from our homes as possible, reducing our energy consumption at home, spending one week each month buying only essential items and avoiding extra spending, using more earth friendly products such as laundry products and carrying reusable bags for purchases. All four families did research via the internet, library and speaking with one another and friends. We compared notes and have continued to share information on local resources, earth-friendly purchasing options, etc. Our entire group learned that it is essential to take care of the health of our planet, our communities and our bodies. By choosing food grown without hormones, pesticides or genetically altered plants we help the environment and humans. By choosing reusable bags, we are eliminating a significant amount of trash from being put into landfills. Most of our members are also using reusable water bottles rather than disposing of plastic water bottles each time. All of the items outlined above have had the benefits of saving money for each household by avoiding waste, educating all of us on being stewards of the earth and on the necessity to remember our fellow beings with whom we share this world. This project has been very inspiring because it is educational and a fairly easy way to see how much of a difference each person can make in this world. All of our members have been excited about contributing to a healthier world.
United States
We prepared the printed Peace Cards (that we drew and designed in November 2006) for sale and talked about ways to sell them. We folded them, added envelopes, made sets of 5 and tied them in ribbon and raffia. We also had a holiday party. Later in January 2007 we sold sets of Peace Cards outside of the local Stop & Shop. After selling cards to friends, family and shoppers, we cleared over $1,400 which was given to the Louis D. Brown Institute to support their programs for families of homicide victims and their anti-violence curriculum for schools.
United States
February 2007-Our group brainstormed ways to save energy and learned a lot from one another. Our leader also talked to us about the amount of energy that goes into making fast foods like hamburgers and french fries. We created pages for our Tips for Tiny Tots...Saving the Earth! book, which went very well. The book is filled with everyday tasks that anyone can do to save energy and recycle waste. This will help the earth become a better place. This book will be shared with preschoolers. We were careful to make clear illustrations and use simple language that little kids could understand.
United States
March 2007- We drew a large floorplan of a house on the whiteboard. We discussed our knowledge of the term "energy footprint" and learned more about it. We learned about home energy use, discussing how we use energy in every room of our house. We painted light switch plates to install at home. The plates were painted with colorful paints to remind us to turn off the lights when we don't need them. Each member was given a gift of one fluorescent light bulb to change out one light bulb in their home. Each member learned the cost savings of using fluorescent lighting.
United States
My cousins, Mike and Liliana brought my brother Michael and I to walk through mountains, hence the name, in a place called Olivera De Azemeis. I will tell you all something. IT WAS INCREDIBLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Wild pine trees and eucalyptus trees towered above us while wild flowers and ferns littered the forest floor. Among this revolution of oxygen-producing machines were snakes, lizards, frogs and insects. In this area, jabalies (wild pigs) were once common. We did not spot one. A sure sign of human intervention - A.K.A. they were over hunted. We walked for about three hours until we reached the very peak of the mountain. It was breath-taking. I have pictures but will download them when I return to America.
United States
On July 11, three members of our group helped the Girdwood Forest Service pull invasive weeds in the Portage area. Weeds like Nettles and White Clover are spreading rapidly and threaten the local wildflowers. We worked for two hours.
United States
One family in our group is working with the Anchorage Bird Learning and Treatment Center to rescue Baby Birds. The family took a halfday class at the BLT in spring. They learned how to care for different kind of birds at different stages of development. After getting a license to care for birds in need, they were added to the BLT contact list. BLT mostly needs people to care for baby birds that fell out of their nests but they also need experienced caretakers for injured birds. In June the family adopted 2 Redpoll chicks and later on one Blackcapped Chickadee. The Redpolls needed feeding every 15 minutes for the first few days. The Chickadee, being a brancher, needed feeding every 30 to 45 minutes. The family raised the birds for approximately 3 weeks at which point the birds were able to self feed and fly. They were then released into the wild. It was a very fun and rewarding experience but also very time consuming. The birds had to be taken along wherever the family went - shopping, baseball games etc.
United States
The Dakota Skippers meet two days a week for eight weeks throughout the summer vacation. We average between 12 to 20 children per meeting ranging in ages of 6 to 13. The Skippers are in charge of cleaning the children's zoo at Bramble Park Zoo. This task assists the zookeepers and teaches students the responsibilities in caring for animals. Goats, donkeys, chickens, owls, corn snakes, mice and rabbits are cared for by attending to their daily needs. When time allows, the rabbits and donkeys are brushed down and haltered so they can be walked around. We meet for two hours. After cleaning the children's zoo, we do projects in other areas. We have had animal handling classes and have pressed flowers from the native gardens and made bookmarks.
United States
Today was our first day of the beautification process. We spent 4 hours pulling out weeds, and the next time we will be overturning the soil and planting flowers. Our main goal for today was to pull out all of the weeds, as the garden was previously a mess. We worked with two elderly women on this project. We learned that pulling weeds is a long process, but is relaxing and rewarding in the end. We came up with this project idea by discussing what we could to do to beautify the main park in Monroe. This project was inspiring because we found out that a little bit of work can make something look much better, and we also received many compliments.

Pages