United States
Through the Green Market/Community Gardens Project, we are preparing our youth to step into a brighter tomorrow by teaching them sustainable farming techniques and adapting a lifestyle that’s healthier for our bodies as well as for the Earth. Local agriculture is a topic of great interest, especially in Brevard County. Most of the food we consume is shipped to us on trucks and trains. For many reasons, this is not sustainable for the future. Hydroponics is wonderful way to use assistive technology with our students with disabilities. Our goal is to raise awareness and inspire all students and those in the community to become aware of the benefits that come from locally fresh grown fruits and vegetables. We at Clearlake Education Center want to encourage people to get away from processed foods and get back to the basics while enhancing our environment. We will promote and encourage healthy eating and volunteering within the community. We are committed to saving the environment through recycling, reducing and reusing, keeping our soil rich and preserving our own health by growing organic and eating healthy. The students and faculty will educate our school community on working together to meet our stated goals. We are going green for the benefit of our world and community. Under the direction of Danielle Campbell, students have been involved for the past 9 years in a state-wide recycling project which involved teaching the school community about recycling. This Green Market and Community Gardens Project is a natural next step to apply our learning to discover opportunities for community connection and self-improvement as a self-supporting, school-based enterprise. Students will learn to prepare and sell goods and craft items that they are creating as part of our recycling program. We will also be selling fresh produce grown with Integrated Pest Management principles in hydroponic systems and raised bed community garden. Students learn how to prepare items for market and to display them to attract customers, how to interact with the public and handle money, as well as the economics of bookkeeping, budgeting and running a retail enterprise. The Green Market invites local growers and craftsmen to set up a table and work side-by-side with us, offering a place for the public to purchase items not available in proximity to the Clearlake community. By accepting EBT/SNAP, we will be serving every nearby demographic. Students will work side-by-side with members of the community and have a chance to get their hands in the dirt in our raised-bed gardens. We will invite the community to lease space for a nominal fee and come and grow produce with us in our raised-bed gardens. We have chosen this approach to help avoid some of the common pitfalls of Florida farming, such as soil-borne pathogens, and other pests. Raised bed gardening is less challenging for those with physical limitations; especially the elderly. The therapeutic benefit of gardening is well documented. Fresh air and sunshine are good for overall health and brain function.
United States
Introduction of native milkweed back into our urban landscape. We have planted seeds and will distribute the plants to key areas of our neighborhoods as well as sell the plants along with a micro-lessons on the need to protect and provide for space and protection for pollinators.
United States
Plant seeds for cucumbers and dill herb. Cultivate soil, water, tend and harvest. Grandma will help me make pickles.
United States
discuss project w/ local school officials, land use, summer school gardening projects.
United States
To teach sustainable processes anyone can do at home to grow healthy food year round.
Canada
Our educational campaign will use Facebook, a social network that connects people of all ages. We will provide general and specific information about waterfowl alongside other content that will quack you up. In the long-term, we will petition to have signage changed in Ottawa, Ontario to be more informative and attention-grabbing.
United States
The MOSI Partnership Garden Patch was developed to enhance science experiences for students by making science more accessible, culturally relevant, and empowering. MOSI Partnership Elementary and University of South Florida students will design and create an urban garden. Throughout the school year the students will plant and cultivate a variety of fruits, vegetables, and garden plants. The produce from the garden will be harvested by the students and distributed to the local shelters. The MOSI Partnership Garden Patch exposes students to community-based service learning projects (MOSI Partnership Elementary has partnered with Metropolitan Ministries Homeless Shelter and the Spring for Women and Children – community based organizations).The garden patch also provides the teachers with an outdoor classroom. The garden’s curriculum focuses on structures in plants and their roles in food production, support, water, nutrient transport and reproduction while incorporating reading, writing, math, and social studies.
Mexico
- Get plants - Foster community participation - Find a place to plant - Ensure the good of the plants - foster good eating habits
United States
Students will have demonstrations on how build bird houses, how to prepare easy and healthy snacks at home, and how to grow a spider plant from seed. Students from Van Arsdale Campus will be able to take home these bird boxes, plants, and snacks. Students will also issue a survey on the cafeteria food to determine the favorite and least favorite food options on the school menu. The survey results will be shared with the chefs of SchoolFoods, which is the school's lunch vendor.
United States
At the start of the year, many of my students refused to work outside of their social groups in the garden. It was a touching transition to see them unite for a common cause after they completed the community map. The students decided to have a fund raiser on parent teacher night to purchase a Japanese Maple tree, and with my guidance, organized themselves into groups. Some students advertised the event, while others created a tri-fold presentation, organized the tables, prepared yogurt parfaits and fruit cups, and sold the food. While the project was started by my Period 2 students, we invited the Period 5 students to help sell the food at the event. Over twenty of my students participated, and at the end of the night, they ran into my classroom with huge smiles and a bucket of money. The classroom environment felt more united after that experience. In one reflection a girl wrote, “At first I didn't think that planting tres in this area was an important as I do now. Now I think every class or school should be doing this." Another student wrote, “"We chose this project because trees are the foundation of everything around us. We knew that if we wanted to fix some of the main issues we see in our community, we had to start with trees because then everything else would fall into place. At first we wanted to just plant more trees for oxygen considering the amount of cars that pass by our community. Then, as we kept talking and sharing out ideas, we realized that we wanted to get parents, teachers and friends involved, which is how our ideas have changed."

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