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We will be making 10 meals for 50 homeless veterans living in transitional housing in Enphront, Atlantic City, NJ. There are 10 houses in which approximately 5 veterans live. This project will fund the cost of putting together a full course meal for the five veterans in each house. Each bag will contain 2 boxes of pasta, one jar of spaghetti sauce, one jar of dressing, a fresh salad, a loaf of Italian bread, homemade meatballs, and a pie or a cake.
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Our project will inspire the young generation to engage in recycling and a more sustainable way of living. Through placing recycling bins within each one of our classrooms, we will highlight the importance of conservation and encourage students to protect our environment for many years to come. As they adapt to a sustainable lifestyle, they will enhance the alarming condition of our planet and become influential leaders who inspire other individuals to do the same. By receiving this mini-grant, our group will have the opportunity to make a strong and life-changing impact towards our campus and student body as a whole.
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Our goal at MBES is to feed the hungry of Oconee County! Our school has an overarching theme of sustainability, and our third grade is in charge of "feeding" the garden with nutritious compost. We are trying to get all of our school involved in that process so that we can create an efficient process to compost with materials that we use everyday.
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Our map will be published we will post the web access in the final evaluation
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Our project will provide raised beds for our students to engage in organic gardening. This project will also continue into the summer and include educational opportunities for our students and their families. We plan to work with our Master Gardens in our community.
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We started with a dream. Then we asked for community ideas. And now we are mid-dream! A local alternative education program has a horticulture and landscaping program, and they helped design the space and gave us ideas for plantings. The idea turned into reality when we marked off the space using t-posts, multi-colored yarn, and a measuring tape. We had help from a co-worker with a backhoe to pull up the sod in the southwest, southeast, and northeast quadrants. A farmer had some nutrient rich soil he brought for those areas. We ask for donations of seeds of any kind to plant in our space, and we received a plethora of vegetable seeds, cover crops, bedding plants, and vegetation to plant. We started planting in the northeast where the vegetables would grow because we knew those seeds would need time for germination. While we waited to see little green sprouts emerge, we used some of the bedding plants and vegetation to plant around our building. We also researched pollinator plants, bees, butterflies, and birds so we could learn what would be best to plant in the southwest quadrant. It was late in the spring so we decided to wait until the fall to actually plant the correct plants. We want to plant our native grasses in raised beds with some walkways around the beds. Our research is taking a little longer than we originally planned, so we have only built the frame for the raised beds, but haven't planted anything yet. We have constructed this space with mostly donated items: cedar logs cut down on land that was being developed for new housing serves as our border; pea gravel scooped up from an elementary school's playground when the school was getting a different type of ground cover; tree stumps for chairs; bird feeders from community friends; outdoor furniture from a local women who was moving; and, a headboard from a twin bed that was on the curb to be taken to the city landfill (we are using the headboard as a trellis for some ivy plants). The landscape and horticulture program instructor gave us a few red wigglers (worms) to start our vermiculture project. We have grown a lot of worms, and have made a vermiculture habitat as part of our overall project. Next to the vermiculture tube is our composting area where we take our fruits, vegetables, and coffee grounds every day. Even our friends in a neighboring business have been bringing their food waste for our compost pile. Inside our building we are recycling paper, metal, glass, cardboard, light bulbs, and batteries. Our dream is becoming a reality only because we have students, parents, colleagues, and other community people helping. The picket fence along the east border of our garden was painted by some college students in the summer. We've already harvested some tomatoes, okra, kale, cucumbers, watermelon, and melons. Our production is large enough yet to share with the schools, but we don't let the produce go away - we fix snacks and lunch!
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Students will use environmental DNA (eDNA) to monitor populations of endangered and threatened species located within the Raccoon Creek watershed of Paulding County (Dallas, GA). Initially, a minimum of 100 students will have an opportunity to work directly with several community partners to study the biodiversity and environmental significance of this prominent waterway. However, this project proposal represents the first step in a large-scale partnership. Thus, this project would eventually benefit the entire Paulding county community. The mini-grant will be used to purchase supplies and reagents needed to perform eDNA analyses and would also greatly defray the cost of other monitoring equipment needed for the start of this project. The equipment and eDNA samples will be used in successive years and would therefore benefit additional students in the future. The overall goal of this project is to provide students with an authentic learning experience with real-world applications.
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It will do education about Peace for all the children from toddlers up (and even older infants) at the school, and their parents, and then for preschool/preK children and up age appropriate education about refugees will happen over the following month and a half, with a stuffed animal drive happening to allow the students and families at the school to do something to help, and then a speaker from UNICEF telling the children how participating in Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF really makes a difference and as a school we engage in participation in that campaign, collecting the UNICEF boxes on Nov. 1 and 2nd here and making the donation as a school, and then celebrating what we have accomplished.
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We will teach children about growing food that's healthy to eat
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Our project will bring food production to our campus, and be a wonderful addition to the freight farm vertical hydroponic farm we will be running near it. It will bridge the school to community gap by bringing the community onto campus. Our project has the added bonus of bringing some interest and landscape to a drab Colorado school landscape! We intend to surround the garden with native flowering plants to bring pollinators, and bird houses to attract bluebirds.

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