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Through this project, we are looking to promote sustainable living in the city of Camden through the distribution of free produce, in a city labeled as a "food desert" during recent years. We are looking for cost effective and recyclable options to grow our produce, while educating members of the community about agriculture around the world, how different cultures depend on agriculture, how individuals in different environments face abuse, how climate change is affecting the world and how we can innovate change.
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We will have lessons about native species and try to locate any native plants that might already be found in the garden. We will investigate which native plants might grow best in our garden and why. We will purchase native plant seedlings and care for them in the garden until they grow and mature. We will study the role each native plant plays in the garden ecosystem and then make comparisons with the role of a native plant found in another natural environment (like a forest). Finally, we will see how our native plants contribute to the success of edible crops.
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With this Roots and Shoots grant, we will be able to provide critical care to 6 Watsonville area public schools. These school orchards serve a combined 5,000 students in grades K-12. With proper seasonal care, the fruit trees in these orchards will bear fruit for up to 100 years. This grant will go towards funding seasonal care visits, where experienced staff members will prune, fertilize, check the irrigation system, and make sure these school orchards are healthy so that they are able to produce the maximum amount of fruit possible! During these care visits we will also engage students from each school in environmental leadership curriculum, helping to create the next generation of youth leaders and environmental stewards.
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The name of our campaign is called Project Oasis. It is called this because of our hopes to reforest the rural Haitian landscape, one small patch at a time. Oftentimes when a team is completed with their project, the result looks like a small green escape from the harsh, dry and rugged Haitian terrain. On each Haiti Plunge trip (about 10 days each) work is done to help reinforce the surrounding area to protect it from further deforestation and erosion. In the wet season this will mean planting as many trees as possible while the soil is in good condition for planting. In the dry season, teams will repair and reinforce the vital and fragile dirt road that leads into the mountains to prevent sink holes, landslides, and erosion. Work areas are determined by village leaders, and by drivers who use the road frequently with vehicles. They know which areas are the most vulnerable. At the work site, people from the surrounding villages assist the Haiti Plunge team with the often back breaking work (picks and shovels are typically all the tools teams have available deep in the mountains). Haitians are able to learn from the Haiti Plunge new ways to protect and prevent their land from erosion. This is crucial as most people are farmers and rely on their farms for their livelihoods. The Haiti Plunge also learns from the Haitians how best to work the unfamiliar land and learn ways the Haitians have been caring for their land for generations. A Roots and Shoots mini grant will assist with the purchasing of trees and other materials needed for this continuous project including cement and sandbags.
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The students are going to research ingredients needed to make the eco-friendly (Homemade Sprays) instead of harmful chemicals such as neonics that have been destroying the pollinator populations. Another project is to create the pollinator friendly nutritious gardens around our local city.
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"Basicly Blackberies" is the first phase of establishing our school's Edible Schoolyard. As we secure funding, we are going to incorporate as many edible plants and fruit/nut trees as possible. This project will transforming the sterile academic landscape into a vibrant organic food oasis.
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Education our school students and adults; start and maintain a school composting program.
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Our project will help us provide and set up composting bins in various class rooms and other locations on campus. Our aim is to teach students the science behind composting and to get them excited about building their own compost so that the collection of left-overs is successful. We will collect bins from school areas on a weekly basis and set-up a designated compost area in our garden. Building and turning our compost pile will become an activity for our garden students to work on regularly! The compost we generate will help the fruits, vegetables, and other plans we grow in our garden to THRIVE!
Garden 2017 Food and Health Landscapes, Trees, and Plants Reduce, Reuse, Recycle 50 30.00 50 Subscribe to group ...
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Most every gardener, dare I say most every human appreciates bees and pollinators. We need them to sustain our very lives. Most of us also aware of the problems of colony collapse and would like to do something even if we don’t have the inclination or location to put up a bee hive. Thankfully there is something we can all do even if we don’t want to become beekeepers and that is create native bee habitat. Planting gardens so that a variety of native bees can not only find a home but find food in a way that is more natural to them, i.e. plant in groupings. There’s so much more to it than just planting a few flowers. Children are our future. The goal is for every school to have an area to plant native flowers. Native flowers help feed bees and are uniquely adapted to their region. Children will learn about the native bees and flowers at school and hopefully will have their own bee habitat at home.

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