New Zealand
Each week, a surprise day of the week will be Litterless Lunch Day. An Enviro student will announce the Litterless Lunch Day at hui that day! Every Litterless Lunch Day, the teacher on lunch duty will take the bottle top box on duty with them. They will check students for zero waste lunches. If you have a litterless lunch, you can take a bottle top from the box and put in your class tin in your classroom! It doesn’t matter which colour! The first class to fill their tin to the top will be awarded The Litterless Lunch Cup at the next assembly, and the cup will stay in their class until the next class takes it. If more than one class reaches the top at the same time, the bottle tops will be counted! It takes about 100 bottle tops to reach the top of the tin, so it will take classes over a month to reach the top! Each term there will probably be one or two winners. For the old Zero Waste Lunch system we had to make tokens out of laminated paper all the time, which was wasteful. With our new Litterless Lunch system we can reuse the bottle tops and the cup over and over again, so it is sustainable. Good luck with your litterless lunching!
United States
As a club, we are focusing both locally and abroad. Our school is in need of trash removal and cleaning up school grounds. We will have an official clean-up on Oct 23 with the National Honors society and the Environmental club. We are also helping to pass this message to the children of Rwanda by partnering with the charity Hope Shines and creating posters on drinking water safety. We will also be fundraising to purchase personal water filters for the children in Rwanda.
United States
16 of our classrooms will each be assigned a garden bed (or a portion of a garden bed) as well as a part of the outdoor learning space to cultivate and maintain. Classes will work during their scheduled time on a weekly basis. Classes will tie curriculum and Missouri State Learning Standards to their work in the garden, bringing together language arts, math, science, and social studies to their experiences in the outdoor classroom.
United States
The kids had a great time building their own nesting habitat and it allowed their creativity to show. Most of the kids recycled materials (soup cans, two liter bottles, etc.) to create a cylinder to hold bamboo and paper tubes. Some kids stated they wanted to build a wooden frame around their tubes and planned to finish their projects at home. To learn more about our project, read our blog post "Insect Hotels: Nesting Habitat for Mason Bees" [ http://evavarga.net/2014/03/20/insect-hotels/ ]
United States
We will plant herbs and vegetable seeds. Once the seeds sprout and are big enough we will clear the plot for a garden and plant the seedlings. The children will record their observations about the garden in their journals. The class will care for the garden through the remainder of the semester and then we will turn it over to the Boys and Girls Club.
United States
Need to go to the village and request improvements to the bike path. Hold town meetings to get the community involve in backing the idea and assisting with neighborhood watch to create safe before and after school experience for the kids.
United States
Have someone at the trash/recycling/compost area after every lunch, telling people where the food or containers go. To have a group of people, everyday, take out the recycling or compost. We can use the knowledge of composting in our homes and potentially create a school garden that can grow food for the kitchen and use the compost to fertilize the soil.
United States
Spread the message of peace through a free, fun family event culminating in the flying of our giant peace dove on a walk to the beach.
India
we do this through a project namely SEED(student empowerment for environmental development).it is divided into three .they are blue,green and white.blue stands for water conservation,green stands for plants and white for cleanliness. it is widely spread in many schools.I am alsio a member of SEED.In each school there will be a co-ordinator .In our school,under the coordinator we formed a club.we palnt trees,we make some awareness programmes and as SEED members we do conservation in our own ways.
United States
My project was to complete the day of compassion assignment for Scott Plous' Social Psychology course on Coursera by making a significant contribution to a high-impact charity and writing about the thought process behind it, in an attempt to educate more people about the most effective ways to give. I did this by donating $1,000 to Population Services International, which does very effective work in improving the lives of people worldwide, and then writing about it to spread the word about how to give effectively. If one cares about maximizing the one's positive impact in the world, some ways are better than others, and it's often quite hard to tell what works and what doesn't just by thinking about what a charity does or considering things such as its overhead costs. For example, if you care about making people healthier, there are lots of possible choices. For example, one could donate to a charity that deals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or you could donate to an organization that prevents the spread of malaria by distributing bed nets in developing countries. The best evidence suggests that it costs around $50,000 to add a year of healthy life for the former case, and about $30-40 in the latter; thus, if you care about making the world much healthier, the largest impact would be to donate to the latter cause. My donation was enough to make most of someone's entire adulthood healthy (the work Population Services International does adds a year of healthy life for about $35), and I was able to do so from the comfort of my own living room. By combining the head and the heart, we can make a much bigger impact on the world. If you're interested in learning more about this concept, search the internet for "effective altruism" to learn more about how with a little thought, anyone can make the world a much better place.

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