United States
We have a school garden established, we'd like to focus on composting, native plants, and hosting school tours/harvest feast.
United States
We are building up a base as a university approved organization. We hope to put together a Passport event every year. Passport events are required by freshmen. We will also hold community events in order to educate the community of the necessity of being conscientious of the environment when making life decisions. We have already held a fossil dig for sharks teeth at a local creek and hope to partner with NC Zoo and other organizations on various projects.
India
we are starting this project from 24 july, 2014. in this project we will try to provide blood or platelets to the needy patients. We will do campaign in different departments of the university and other educational institutes for blood and eye donations. we will also try to convince new donors to join this noble cause.
United States
The children will plants seeds and water them and eventually be able to eat what they have grown! We will share the fruits of our labor with our community. Also, we will learn ways to recycle water and not waste it! Needed to start: planting soil, seeds or small plants, watering cans, gardening tools!
United States
Our Waterford School Roots & Shoots group wanted to present to preschool students the importance of recycling, composting, eating healthy and waste-free lunches.
United States
Our overarching goal in this project was to have students explore food systems and to understand how their food choices affect the environment, their health, and the economy.
Malta
The project target school children and young parents. We organize talks, outings and school activities to create an awareness.
United States
With 20 hours of daylight, the garden flourished in the bush of the Alaskan tundra on the Bering Sea! It was a great success and the fence was secured to keep out the moose, rabbits, dogs and wolves. It was an ongoing process and will continue to be used hopefully for many years. In the long daylight hours of the Alaskan summer, weeds have an excellent opportunity to thrive therefore we taught children how to discern weeds from cultivated plants and some of the "weeds" such as chamomile were harvested and used for tea, food and medicine. It is much work cultivating in the acidic tundra soils however the garden progressed beautifully and with great success. Children are learning, planting, weeding, watering and observing. We worked in the garden several hours a day and Kenkamken's aana (mother in Yup'ik Eskimo language) was welcome to harvest any time although she lived quite a distance from the garden at Lake Aleknagik. "This is your garden" I explained when she visited. While still in mourning for her daughter, she was deeply moved to tears by the Kenkamken Memorial Garden. She was thoroughly touched to be engaged in the garden that bears her daughter's name in Yup'ik language. I told her that she is welcome to have the plaque that I painted and hung on the garden in Kenkamken's memory with the state flower of Alaska, Myosotis, forget-me-not painted on it. Kenkamken's aana took the plaque and I believe it is an inspiration and a blessing for her to continue to cultivate in Kenkamken's memory. Her son, Pipiisiiq will continue to cultivate in his beloved sister's memory as a way to bring comfort and beauty to his family's life. The garden was a meeting place of solace. Some made paintings of the beautiful flowers. Children delighted in hunting for peas, strawberries and spinach leaves (like Popeye consumed for strength!) every day and they loved to see the potato plants push up through the soil. The children so enjoyed tasting fresh chives and sweet baby carrots. Yup'ik elders visited and harvested and shared their ethnobotanical uses of wild harvested plants. We shared with visitors every day and welcomed all. There are some farmers' markets in the town of Dillingham however our garden produce was free! Obtaining nutritious pesticide-free produce is a great challenge in the long winters in Alaska. Many suffer from nutritional deficiencies, which in turn affects physical and mental health. Cultivating in the acidic tundra soils was a great deal of work but the garden developed beautifully, collectively and successfully. The garden will live on……and so will Kenkamken's blessed memory.
New Zealand
If we as a family are more firmly vegetarian, we can inspire others, demonstrating that it is possible to be fit and healthy as vegetarians.
Australia
it will stop animals from dieing and help them have a longer and happier life and will keep us much more healthy

Pages