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We will partner with our local Public Works Department to install "no dumping" markers on the storm drains with the most exposure and then move on to other areas.
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In order to combat environmental illiteracy and apathy, the Bioma program makes use of engaging hands-on activities, such as building a shrimp hatchery or surveying macro-invertebrate densities in a stream, rather than focusing on conventional lectures or textbook learning. We decided early on that the educational program throughout our schools should not involve our direct oversight, but rather allow local autonomy for students and teachers to incorporate local elements and choose how they would learn. By doing so, the program was able to nurture the students’ innate creativity and sense of responsibility, something that the rote memorization approach that characterizes many classrooms today would not have encouraged. The success of this approach can be seen in the student’s proactive approach towards designing and running their own projects; the fundraising, youth fishing programs, and stream surveys were all conceived and run by program graduates. The Bioma curriculum was designed to facilitate genuine interest and curiosity in material. Instead of quizzes and textbook readings, the Bioma approach encouraged classroom discussion, hands-on learning, and student autonomy. At environmental expos, the group held live demos of critters under microscopes and created a touch tank stocked with native species instead of a conventional powerpoint, while in classrooms, students are encouraged to build and shape things with their hands, something that most Bioma teachers have never recalled doing often in past courses. Through Bioma’s technical workshops, such as the virtual reality or disasters simulation project, students can craft and create their own projects based on interesting things they can discover, leading to an innate curiosity and better retention of the knowledge that will serve them for years to come.
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One of us has studied journalism, one has taken documentary-producing classes, some have lots of ocean knowledge, and others are eager to learn! We're going to outline a series of several videos we want to make, each highlighting a difference changemaker, and then experience the world of mini-documentary filming.
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We will use microscopes and books to ask questions about the water and land we already know. Each of us will ask different questions so we may each get different ideas or answers from the project. That is good!
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Students will venture to Mt. Hood to investigate the timberline ecosystem at 6,000 feet beginning this school year. The Mt. Hood wilderness provides a unique opportunity for students to learn about the subalpine habitat. Our alpine ecology curriculum will focus on seasonal changes in a high mountain environment. Students summarize as teams, comparing and contrasting as an entry level opportunity for an introduction to climate change. Snow crystal studies, measurement of snow depth, temperature and wind speed, adaptations of alpine plants and animals, hibernation and the relationship between alpine birds and trees are some investigations students will participate in to build background knowledge of the area. They will observe how these variations can affect organisms that thrive in the subalpine habitat. The learner will connect to concrete observations and explain as scientists would through mapping, data collection and journaling. They will summarize as teams, comparing and contrasting data to create possible explanations of how environmental conditions influence the organisms that live in the ecological area. Students will measure snowpack and it’s relationship to the budding of Mountain hemlock trees. They'll research the impact of drought, bark beetle infestation, and blight on Whitebark pines. They will investigate the symbiotic relationship between the Clark's nutcrackers to Whitebark pines. Students are partnering with the National Park Service. This program will be on-going for years. As students begin to collect data, they will compare information/data from other National Parks and move toward solutions to preserve and protect this ecosystem.
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Students will venture to Mt. Hood to investigate the timberline ecosystem at 6,000 feet beginning this school year. The Mt. Hood wilderness provides a unique opportunity for students to learn about the subalpine habitat. Our alpine ecology curriculum will focus on seasonal changes in a high mountain environment. Students summarize as teams, comparing and contrasting as an entry level opportunity for an introduction to climate change. Snow crystal studies, measurement of snow depth, temperature and wind speed, adaptations of alpine plants and animals, hibernation and the relationship between alpine birds and trees are some investigations students will participate in to build background knowledge of the area. They will observe how these variations can affect organisms that thrive in the subalpine habitat. The learner will connect to concrete observations and explain as scientists would through mapping, data collection and journaling. They will summarize as teams, comparing and contrasting data to create possible explanations of how environmental conditions influence the organisms that live in the ecological area. Students will measure snowpack and the budding of Mountain hemlock that support the Clark’s nutcrackers. They'll research the impact of Whitebark pines due to drought, bark beetle infestation, and blight. Students are partnering with the National Parks. This program will be on-going for years. As students begin to collect data, they will compare information/data from other National Parks and move toward solutions to preserve and protect this ecosystem.
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We started by learning about how our vast populations of people have polluted the oceans. In the process we learned about how all life on earth is dependent on our oceans being healthy and in balance. The focus quickly went to the impact of plastics, looking at waste of plastic bags and straws. Through the Students Rebuild project, each "sea creature" we created was result in $2 being donated to protecting and cleaning our oceans. We made hundreds of mostly origami sea creatures, including whales, angel fish, sea anemones, clam shells, and jelly fish.
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Our wish for Beach Bucket Brigade is to involve our beach-going community members in keeping our beaches clean. The emphasis with be on encouraging children to participate in helping the environment and educating the public on the threats litter poses to wildlife. In addition, we will also teach people how to reduce their carbon footprints and plastic usage. Ultimately, we would love for town, county, and state beaches to adopt this program.
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Our students will connect with nature in our own neighborhood and learn about conservation and activism in the process.
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We will inform as many people as we can about the harmfulness of straws. We will get in touch with local businesses and try our hardest to convince them to use compostable or reusable straws.

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