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This year we have made 4 trips to Nana Cardoon, one in the Fall and three this Spring. Our Spring trips were in April and May. We are looking at how nature changes with the seasons. One of our focuses this year was the role that soil plays in growing plants. Each visit we have done activities that help builds quality soil. As well as observing and exploring, we have planted potatoes and corn, and helped remove invasive English Ivy. We even learned to weave the ivy into baskets, making something useful from it. We have made various flat breads from grain grown at the farm, made tortilla of 3 colors of corn, made tabbouleh salad with dandelion greens, and short cake for a strawberry feast! We have explored changes in the garden, the role of pollinators, as well as methods of recycling, including vermiculture (worms). We also used the sun to cook delicious banana bread. Our visits have ended with a group meal, enjoying our food creations. The results have been tasty. For our final visit, we had a strawberry feast with cooked pound cake. This was our celebration of a successful year!
United States
Our project tackles a wide variety of issues found in our community, so there is a variety of ways we can measure our impact. First, once the produce we grow is ready to be harvested and given to either the students to take home for their parents to cook with or given to the cafeteria to use in the school lunch for the day , that is an obvious indication that the garden beds and the effort to provide organic, nutritious produce to kids living in "food deserts" was successful. Furthermore, after we work with teachers and faculty at the schools/centers to develop environmental educational lesson plans to teach to the students, we can tell by the students reactions to learning new material how excited they are to have this opportunity. Additionally, the garden beds and tending to them are a good form of therapy for the students who live in harmful environmental exposures, such as air pollution, which often occurs in communities facing SES stressors including deteriorating housing, poor access to health care, high unemployment, crime, and poverty, which may exacerbate negative health effects. Once the students are each given a seedling to plant, and are given the responsibility to take care of it and watch it develop into life, it really benefits the students. Also, once we install the garden beds, we plant milkweed (which is the main food source for monarch butterflies) which instantly attracts monarch butterflies, which almost instantly brightens the entire mood of the campus as well as beautifies it by providing lush pre-sprouted seedlings. Another indicator we use to measure the impact our project has made is when we see the relationship and bonds develop between the volunteers and the students that we bring ht garden beds to. Over time, the students open up to the volunteers and work side by side on the garden bed, not only gaining a hands-on science experiment but also developing a sense of having a role model and someone to look up to. We will collaborate by reaching out to under-served elementary schools and at-risk youth centers in the surrounding community to bring the community together, to unify us through the power of obtaining knowledge. We will also reach out to UF students on campus for those who are interested in volunteering on the garden beds and engaging with the students at these schools/ at-risk youth centers. We will show courage by not allowing the socio-economic cleavages in our community put the under-served students at a disadvantage. We will rise past the deep rooted social-scturture to connect and engage our community to close that gap. We will show courage by not giving up on our mission even if a school or youth center is unable to take on the garden beds and declines our offer, which is the biggest challenge we face. But its okay, we expect this because our goal is to reach out to struggling facilities that need the help. We will increase our compassion by reaching out to more elementary schools and at risk youth centers to make an impact as many students as we can, because we believe they deserve the same opportunities as every other student despite their socio-economic status. We will increase our passion by attempting to the engage the community as much as possible, wether it be from reaching out to more students who could potentially be interested as volunteers, or reaching out to more than just elementary schools but hopefully middle and high schools as well. We will continue to expand and make a difference to the best of our abilities.
United States
Our project tackles a wide variety of issues found in our community, so there is a variety of ways we can measure our impact. First, once the produce we grow is ready to be harvested and given to either the students to take home for their parents to cook with or given to the cafeteria to use in the school lunch for the day , that is an obvious indication that the garden beds and the effort to provide organic, nutritious produce to kids living in "food deserts" was successful. Furthermore, after we work with teachers and faculty at the schools/centers to develop environmental educational lesson plans to teach to the students, we can tell by the students reactions to learning new material how excited they are to have this opportunity. Additionally, the garden beds and tending to them are a good form of therapy for the students who live in harmful environmental exposures, such as air pollution, which often occurs in communities facing SES stressors including deteriorating housing, poor access to health care, high unemployment, crime, and poverty, which may exacerbate negative health effects. Once the students are each given a seedling to plant, and are given the responsibility to take care of it and watch it develop into life, it really benefits the students. Also, once we install the garden beds, we plant milkweed (which is the main food source for monarch butterflies) which instantly attracts monarch butterflies, which almost instantly brightens the entire mood of the campus as well as beautifies it by providing lush pre-sprouted seedlings. Another indicator we use to measure the impact our project has made is when we see the relationship and bonds develop between the volunteers and the students that we bring ht garden beds to. Over time, the students open up to the volunteers and work side by side on the garden bed, not only gaining a hands-on science experiment but also developing a sense of having a role model and someone to look up to. We will collaborate by reaching out to under-served elementary schools and at-risk youth centers in the surrounding community to bring the community together, to unify us through the power of obtaining knowledge. We will also reach out to UF students on campus for those who are interested in volunteering on the garden beds and engaging with the students at these schools/ at-risk youth centers.
United States
By partnering with churches, schools, and community centers (organizations) in the Atlanta corridor and surrounding areas, Project G.R.A.P.E will use the land made available by the churches and schools involved in order to grow, teach, and serve the community. Project G.R.A.P.E. will focus on educating communities by teaching the need and importance of gardening and self-sustained living. While recruiting volunteers, Project G.R.A.P.E. will host weekend events where our participants will learn about gardening. Topics that will be discussed during these weekend events will include but are not limited to, gardening with green limited space, growing produce through re-planting and composting. These weekend events will not only help teach a new generation of people how to grow their own food, but these youth that participate will be able to spread this knowledge to people in their lives. Project G.R.A.P.E. will be able to engage new generation with bold, fun techniques while also teaching them life-long skills that will potentially end childhood hunger.
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Sts. Peter & Paul 5th & 6th graders will grow with aquaponics edible plants, including lettuce, herbs, and vegetables to transplant in a garden reserved for community produce. Students will harvest the produce and keep refrigerated until it can be arranged to give to local food pantry visitors in need of healthy foods.
Uganda
Environmental concerns cut across the globe irrespective of the age, creed, race and nationality thus combined efforts are inevitable to bring out meaningful and feasible environment conservation results. My wish is to call upon all environmental conservationist lovers who must make this globe a better place to live for the present and future generations to support my environment project. For further details , Please get in touch with: Mucungura Adeodato , Managing Director. Email: urudo50@yahoo.com, +256 782 863472
United States
Our campus is considered a living campus where food is cultivated and nutrition is a key element of the program. We believe in educating the whole child and teaching our students the importance of learning where your food comes from is a priority. Our GA 8th-grade students want to share that message by holding a community farmers market introducing our surrounding neighbors to a new parkway garden that we will plant around the school's southern perimeter for the community to have fresh whole fruits and vegetables. Students will clear the space and amend the soil during their GA classes. There will be one workday with community members to plant the gardens. On the day the gardens are introduced to the community, students will hold a community farmer market. We will place flyers on the doors of the neighbors directly surrounding our school site to invite them to the market.
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Youth learn about community involvement, collaboration, self-sufficiency and leadership by planting and raising community gardens, harvesting produce and hand-making goods to sell at local farmer's markets, caring for livestock, participating in edible plant walks and more!
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Students will use mathematical knowledge, in measurement, ratio, and geometry to design and build their own vertical gardens. In addition, they will address 6th grades standards of Engineering and Design and Materials and Tools. Furthermore, the vertical gardens will provide exposure to alternate food production options to our students and family while simultaneously producing crops for the school to use in the cafeteria and farmer’s market.
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We will continue to provide our garden to the members of Camden, so they can have access to produce without having to travel far. Our organization, Hopeworks, along with volunteers will continue to maintain and support the garden for the residents that want to grow their own food. We also donate all the extras to a local church where they hand it out during their food drives.

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