United States
In the fall, we will dig a trench, fill it with maple logs from a tree that was cut down a couple of years ago, branches, etc. We will add composted leaves from our town, surround it with straw bales, and plant cover crops of winter rye and hairy vetch. In the spring, we will plant peas, which fix nitrogen, as well as being delicious. We would research other plants that would make sense for the area: maybe mushrooms, currants and blueberries. The result we would hope for would be good soil with lots of microorganism and edible plants for ourselves and the birds successfully grown from it. We would photograph it, and science classes could analyze the soil and micro-organisms. We would also use this as a demonstration of hugelkultur for students at all our schools and for the community - posting on a website and hosting visits.
United States
We are located on a USDA research facility (although no funding for this project is from them), and have a lot of space to expand our bee program and project. Our high school students are interested in creating a program and a traveling trunk for younger students to learn about bees. We know that the population of honey bees is decreasing all of the time. Since we are a STEM center with programming for school age children and community stakeholders, we are going to develop kid-friendly information to help maintain and increase the bee population in our area. We have researched the type of foliage we need to plant, the equipment needed for our project, signage we need around the property, safety precautions, and citizen science activities about bees. Our students will be completing all of these research topics and putting them into action.
United States
My project will educate other kids at my school on multiple ways that they can create an environment to support bee populations. I will transform an acre of my yard into a few different areas that will appeal to bees. I will take pictures to use in my school presentation and make a video discussing some ways our global food supply would be affected without pollinators and give some helpful facts to show my classmates how even doing a little can help a lot.
United States
The action timeline for The Thriving Hive Project will be 25 weeks. In this time our group will plant organic, non-genetically modified, Southern California native, drought - tolerant pollinating gardens at local schools and community gardens.
United States
The take action timeline will be 25-weeks. I will do this by working with community members and peers to plant organic, non-genetically modified, drought tolerant, pollinating gardens at local schools and community gardens.
Greece
The next step is to organize this information to a powerpoint and spread it to our social circle (like clubs, organizations, schools etc). The last step is to inform and try to sensitize some of the local food industries and persuade them to stop the use of palmoil in their products.
United States
to make flyers to hang up around the school and tell people about the topic of Palm oil
United States
Still in planning...but talking about adding hives, educating people on bees, planting more orchards or fruit trees and flowers.
United States
The grandchildren (now ages 4 and 6) help to choose plants, and they help to plant and care for them. They have selected fruit trees to grow and have specified which butterflies to try to attract to the garden. They help to water and to weed and to fill the bird-feeder.
United States
My project would help my family and the environment. I will do it by asking to put a Mulch trash can for lunch and it will be sold for money for our school.

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