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This year we have made 4 trips to Nana Cardoon, one in the Fall and three this Spring. Our Spring trips were in April and May. We are looking at how nature changes with the seasons. One of our focuses this year was the role that soil plays in growing plants. Each visit we have done activities that help builds quality soil. As well as observing and exploring, we have planted potatoes and corn, and helped remove invasive English Ivy. We even learned to weave the ivy into baskets, making something useful from it. We have made various flat breads from grain grown at the farm, made tortilla of 3 colors of corn, made tabbouleh salad with dandelion greens, and short cake for a strawberry feast! We have explored changes in the garden, the role of pollinators, as well as methods of recycling, including vermiculture (worms). We also used the sun to cook delicious banana bread. Our visits have ended with a group meal, enjoying our food creations. The results have been tasty. For our final visit, we had a strawberry feast with cooked pound cake. This was our celebration of a successful year!
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At bare minimum, the project will prove successful if local youth gain service-learning hours for installing the conservation garden in ways that spark meaningful prior Green School PTSA memorializing conversation and reflection. This success indicator is very reachable being that The Natural Roots Project’s (NRP’s) partner-organization, The Empowerment Center of Maryland, Inc, has agreed to both: a) host youth-preparatory sessions at their facility, and b) provide the 501c3 criteria necessary to grant service-learning credit. Furthermore, many Cherry Hill plot holders are elderly retirees, accustomed to seeing mainly food planted at their location. Thus, the conservation garden is likely to spark much curiosity, inquiry and conversation. The process of garden installation and community response will be documented via a youth coordinated video montage and short feedback surveys respectively.
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As part of our campaign, we will be contributing time to the weekly bbqs near the train tracks where many live in one of 2 tent cities. We will offer the mats for sitting (there's so much mud from intense weather) and the seed kits for planting in the community garden near the shelter. We will engage in conversation starting with, "What's your name?" We know that homeless people are rarely asked this basic human question. We will track how many people we connect with, creating humanity within our community. Having learned mapping at ESRI when I was with the NYLC, I am planning to show my group other homeless communities in the Capitol region that we need to reach out to. We will also create relationships with the youth by gardening together.
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The goal of this project was to raise awareness about changes that anyone can make to reduce their carbon footprint, while also uniting our school's community through a plant giveaway. We created two kinds of booklets that we gave away along with the plants: one about how to support native plants and pollinators, and another about how to reduce your carbon footprint. We hoped that this project would raise awareness about the impact that an individual can have on the planet.
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At the end of very visible 1st street in Missoula, Montana, we would love to implement a permaculture yard to reclaim the soil and demonstrate the power of plants. We want to hire a local mural artist to beautify the building. We want to build a large outdoor compost system to process urban food waste, educate locals on the power of composting, and give back finished soil to the city. We have big dreams and need some financial support.
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Our project tackles a wide variety of issues found in our community, so there is a variety of ways we can measure our impact. First, once the produce we grow is ready to be harvested and given to either the students to take home for their parents to cook with or given to the cafeteria to use in the school lunch for the day , that is an obvious indication that the garden beds and the effort to provide organic, nutritious produce to kids living in "food deserts" was successful. Furthermore, after we work with teachers and faculty at the schools/centers to develop environmental educational lesson plans to teach to the students, we can tell by the students reactions to learning new material how excited they are to have this opportunity. Additionally, the garden beds and tending to them are a good form of therapy for the students who live in harmful environmental exposures, such as air pollution, which often occurs in communities facing SES stressors including deteriorating housing, poor access to health care, high unemployment, crime, and poverty, which may exacerbate negative health effects. Once the students are each given a seedling to plant, and are given the responsibility to take care of it and watch it develop into life, it really benefits the students. Also, once we install the garden beds, we plant milkweed (which is the main food source for monarch butterflies) which instantly attracts monarch butterflies, which almost instantly brightens the entire mood of the campus as well as beautifies it by providing lush pre-sprouted seedlings. Another indicator we use to measure the impact our project has made is when we see the relationship and bonds develop between the volunteers and the students that we bring ht garden beds to. Over time, the students open up to the volunteers and work side by side on the garden bed, not only gaining a hands-on science experiment but also developing a sense of having a role model and someone to look up to. We will collaborate by reaching out to under-served elementary schools and at-risk youth centers in the surrounding community to bring the community together, to unify us through the power of obtaining knowledge. We will also reach out to UF students on campus for those who are interested in volunteering on the garden beds and engaging with the students at these schools/ at-risk youth centers. We will show courage by not allowing the socio-economic cleavages in our community put the under-served students at a disadvantage. We will rise past the deep rooted social-scturture to connect and engage our community to close that gap. We will show courage by not giving up on our mission even if a school or youth center is unable to take on the garden beds and declines our offer, which is the biggest challenge we face. But its okay, we expect this because our goal is to reach out to struggling facilities that need the help. We will increase our compassion by reaching out to more elementary schools and at risk youth centers to make an impact as many students as we can, because we believe they deserve the same opportunities as every other student despite their socio-economic status. We will increase our passion by attempting to the engage the community as much as possible, wether it be from reaching out to more students who could potentially be interested as volunteers, or reaching out to more than just elementary schools but hopefully middle and high schools as well. We will continue to expand and make a difference to the best of our abilities.
Through FUNDERS & DONOR'S, The BEEKEEPING project will provide a continuous experience for the people involved, and get more people involved in activities that will increase their knowledge concerning Conservation And hence will reduce the impacts towards Environment. Establishment of this project relies on the founding of 200 hives on community land as well as the training of key people in beekeeping skills.
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Our project tackles a wide variety of issues found in our community, so there is a variety of ways we can measure our impact. First, once the produce we grow is ready to be harvested and given to either the students to take home for their parents to cook with or given to the cafeteria to use in the school lunch for the day , that is an obvious indication that the garden beds and the effort to provide organic, nutritious produce to kids living in "food deserts" was successful. Furthermore, after we work with teachers and faculty at the schools/centers to develop environmental educational lesson plans to teach to the students, we can tell by the students reactions to learning new material how excited they are to have this opportunity. Additionally, the garden beds and tending to them are a good form of therapy for the students who live in harmful environmental exposures, such as air pollution, which often occurs in communities facing SES stressors including deteriorating housing, poor access to health care, high unemployment, crime, and poverty, which may exacerbate negative health effects. Once the students are each given a seedling to plant, and are given the responsibility to take care of it and watch it develop into life, it really benefits the students. Also, once we install the garden beds, we plant milkweed (which is the main food source for monarch butterflies) which instantly attracts monarch butterflies, which almost instantly brightens the entire mood of the campus as well as beautifies it by providing lush pre-sprouted seedlings. Another indicator we use to measure the impact our project has made is when we see the relationship and bonds develop between the volunteers and the students that we bring ht garden beds to. Over time, the students open up to the volunteers and work side by side on the garden bed, not only gaining a hands-on science experiment but also developing a sense of having a role model and someone to look up to. We will collaborate by reaching out to under-served elementary schools and at-risk youth centers in the surrounding community to bring the community together, to unify us through the power of obtaining knowledge. We will also reach out to UF students on campus for those who are interested in volunteering on the garden beds and engaging with the students at these schools/ at-risk youth centers.
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Student Day of Caring provides an avenue for students to engage in brief volunteer service projects. The Twin County United Way conducts annual Days of Caring to promote volunteerism with businesses and schools. Student Days of Caring are intended introduce students to volunteering and encourage students to continue to volunteer throughout the year and into the future. The students will be at a dozen different locations around the Lewis-Clark Valley participating in a variety of hands-on activities including cleaning, yardwork, painting, repackaging food and sorting donations. This takes place on the first day of school for Lewiston High School, and involves all students who are seniors.
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Student Day of Caring provides an avenue for students to engage in brief volunteer service projects. The Twin County United Way conducts annual Days of Caring to promote volunteerism with businesses and schools. Student Days of Caring are intended introduce students to volunteering and encourage students to continue to volunteer throughout the year and into the future. The students will be at a dozen different locations around the Lewis-Clark Valley participating in a variety of hands-on activities including cleaning, yardwork, painting, repackaging food and sorting donations.

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