United States
The youth of our church gathered together to make peace doves. We used nearly all recycled materials (bottles and bags) and everyone lent a hand to help make the peace dove puppets. One family brought their Giant Peace Doves and the kids had a wonderful time flying their doves after the service. Before beginning each child wrote on a card what they would do to promote peace in their family and community and put it in their bottle.
United States
We spent time at two consecutive home school park days and as the main activity at a 4-H communication project meeting, and then more time while on a home school camping trip the weekend of the event, creating about 60 colorful Pinwheels for Peace as well as a small white peace dove made from recycled materials. In the future we'd like to find a way to create pinwheels using as little plastic as possible. We gathered around a central area in front of all our campsites on the morning of Sunday, September 19, 2008 and put all 60 pinwheels in the ground, carefully placing them on their bamboo skewers and taping them so that we could get maximum spin assistance from the wind. We thought later that we would've liked to have arranged them in a giant peace sign, so we'll do that next year! The day before this was California Coastal Clean-up day, so we were all keyed into stewardship and the environment as we watched the colorful stars whirling in the breeze. A bunch of little kids took turns running in a big circle around the pinwheels, pulling the mini peace dove through the air. Next year we are definitely going to make at least one giant peace dove, if not more. It's a perfect home schoolers' park day activity, and one that I hope will pull some of our youth into the action. I loved seeing so many kids attracted by the opportunity to do some art and to contribute to the day's hopes for peace.
United States
We had a collection drive at our school to gather donations of clean unwanted socks. Then we filled the socks with a combination of catnip and poly-fill or "holey" socks and tied the top of the sock closed in a knot. we ended up making enough Happy Socks to fill 3 large trash bags! As an end of the year activity, we took a field trip to the local Humane Society and gave them the Happy Socks to provide for the homeless kitties that arrive at the shelter. As a thank you, the staff at the Humane Society gave us a tour of their facility.
Canada
For Peace Day members of the English as a Second Language class made posters and placed them in the hallways at school. On Monday morning some students and teachers spoke over the intercom to the whole school. They shared how to say hello and peace in their native tongues. This was a very simple activity but it was quite powerful. Many students had only been in Saskatoon a few weeks and found the courage to speak over the intercom to the whole school.
Canada
On September 18th, we set up a table in our school's cafeteria to raise awareness for International Day of Peace. Students were encouraged to trace their hand and sign their names on a giant white bed sheet.
United States
Our goals were to learn about butterfly gardening and about the butterfly's role in a healthy ecosystem, with a special focus on monarch preservation. We went outside to the backyard to our small patch of potted milkweed and observed the different stages of the monarch butterfly's life cycle, including the egg, the caterpillar, the chrysalis, the butterfly, and even a parasitics chrysalis and a monarch laying eggs! Then we tried digging the invasion of thriving bulb plants out of our flower beds, but we found that the ground they were growing in was too hard to dig in easily! Next we planted the seeds of milkweed, the monarch's larval plant, in reused milk cartons, cups, and mini ice cream containers. First we picked our container, and if it was a milk carton we cut off the top. Next, we poked holes in the bottoms of our containers, then filled them with organic potting soil and after shallowly burying milkweed seeds in the soil, we gave the soil several gentle mists of water with the sprayer. Most of the members took their growing containers home, and will bring them back to plant when they are sprouts at our next meeting. Members also had the opportunity to bring home monarch chrysalises, and be able to experience first-hand observation of butterfly metamorphosis.
United States
We are working with Xavier Cortada to help restore mangrove trees here in the Miami Area. We have displayed mangrove seedlings in cups as part of the Restoration Project. Last year we helped plant 2000 seedlings in the Virginia Key area. We will plant new seedlings again this year.
United States
When Haiti was hit hard by three major storms a call to action went out in South Florida. Haiti was literally underwater for weeks and the destruction was beyond belief. As a club we answered the call by organizing a rice and bean food drive. We asked each student in the school to bring in a bag of rice and a bag of beans. In one week we raised over 2000 pounds of food! The food was taken to the Notre Dame de Haiti Catholic church which organized clothing and food to ship to Haiti.
United States
The MYB elementary school Roots & Shoots Club collected leaves for the leaf cutter ant colony at Yale's Peabody Museum of Natural History. We had a great time and learned about some local trees.
United States
At the global youth summit I met two young people from Nepal who are running an animal sanctuary there. My group back home really wanted to help them, so they sent us a large box of hand made crafts and we sold them in the US, all the money went back to help the animals in Nepal. We also sold home made baked goods.

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