United States
We will have all the kids in all the apartment complexes around us to plant gardens that will grow the tomatoes, green peppers, spinach, broccoli, lettuce, spices, carrots, strawberries, blue berries, raspberries and other food to make healthy pizza and fun salads, have them make and eat their foods, and then go deliver healthy pizza and fun salads to other kids in the neighborhoods who don't eat healthy.
United States
We will create the garden in a 10x10m space allotted to us by the university. We have teamed up with Ryan Harb and Jono Neiger of Amhurst, MA to create a design that will meet our goals and thrive. A Garden Dream Team of students and faculty are in charge of design decisions. The Team is networking with outside groups such as the CT chapter of the National Organic Farmers Association, Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, and Sodexo to gather support in forms of monetary contributions, as well as labor. Soil preparation is already underway, thanks to the effort of several faculty and students. Planting will begin in late spring. Plants will be donated or purchased with grant money. Garden maintenance should be minimal (if we design it right), but will be undertaken by volunteers, including the Dream Team. Watch our progress at : http://www.wcsu.edu/goodall/permculture.asp#updates
United States
Our project involves the construction of a community garden which can be accessed by families during the summer months. Students would utilize the garden during the school year to connect math, science, health, and social studies. We have students, teachers, parents, and class time to use to build our garden. An action plan has been started and we need to move forward with funding.
United States
My project will provide food for the poor and people in need. We will do this by planting many vegetables at a garden plot and picking them daily. After we get enough vegetables we will deliver them to the people who need them.
United States
Our garden will replace a patch of grass that consumes thousands of gallons of water every month. This is crucial in Southern California, where we currently have an unprecedented drought. According to our calculations, our garden will only need half the water the lawn drinks up. After scouting this location with local gardening experts and project leaders, we will draw up a layout for the garden, i.e. fences, beds, irrigation, trees, ideal plant layout, etc. We will then acquire the necessary things we need to plant. These include seeds, small plants, lumber, construction materials, and tools. We will try to get as many of these as we can donated by local businesses. Meanwhile, we will be spreading the word and recruiting as many volunteers as we can to help us. The more students we get involved at our school, the more successful our garden will be. We will also target teachers, parents, and community members and ask them to help. This will all be finished by late February. Then, in March, we PLANT! After planting, we will maintain a healthy base of support to ensure the success of our garden in the future. We will host events like gardening days and garden parties to raise awareness about causes like hunger and environmental issues. Our garden will continue to be a beacon for philanthropy and environmental stewardship in our community.
United States
This year we have made 12 visits to B-Street, starting in the Fall with harvest and ending with our last meeting in June there. We have harvested crops, mulched fields, weeded, planted crops, built "willow houses", cooked in a cobb oven & on "rocket stoves", made "stone soup" for homeless women's shelter, built a butterfly / beneficial insect flower garden, made "mason bee" houses, studied pond life & cycles, and learned how to care for rabbits & bunnies. It has been wonderful to have a "place" to learn from and put our efforts toward making a difference. Our visits have been after-school events. As an added benefit, it has introduced Roots&Shoots families to this great community resource.
United States
Worcester's poor neighborhoods suffer disproportionate exposure to urban environmental health and social problems. We mainly work in the Main South and Piedmont neighborhoods, which have elevated exposure to health risks, particularly lead contamination. Soil contamination is an environmental justice issue, because it disproportionately impacts low-income communities of color in Worcester. According to the US census of 2010, 27% of individuals in the Worcester’s Main South neighborhood, where this community live, are below poverty level compare to 19% in the entire city. Older housing stock and the highway that cuts through the Main South neighborhood has also contributed to soil pollution by lead and other contaminants. As cities have far less green space than rural and suburban areas, it is of utter importance that what green space exists is suitable for use. We will educate, raise awareness, and take action with Worcester residents to reduce lead contamination in Main South and Piedmont area soils. We will do hands-on workshops that include soil sampling, interactive activities and distribution of Do-It-Yourself Lead Safe Yard Manuals. Specific action steps: --8 participatory workshops reaching 80 people, teaching them how to identify soil contaminants --12 youth trained as leaders in community environmental action --2 door-to-door outreach sessions alerting residents in high-risk areas of possible contamination, resources available and steps they can take to make safe yards --2 yards remediated --1 demonstration garden site --65 Do-It-Yourself Lead Safe Yard Manuals distributed

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